3 Best CPUs for Counter Strike: GO (CS:GO) [2020]

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Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 12-core, 24-thread unlocked desktop processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Intel Core i9 i9-9900K Octa-core (8 Core) 3.60 GHz Processor - Socket H4 LGA-1151 - Retail Pack - 8 GT/s DMI - 64-bit Processing - 5 GHz Overclocking Speed - 14 nm - 3 Number of Monitors Supported - I
Best Price-Performance Ratioi
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X
Intel Core i9 i9-9900K
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Intel
AMD
Performance category
High-end CPU segment
High-end CPU segment
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
12 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.6 GHz Max Turbo )
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 5.0 GHz Max Turbo )
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Q3/2018
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Superb price-for-performance ratio in multithreaded scenarios
  • Relatively low power consumption
  • Easy overclocking tools
  • Huge L3 cache.
  • Two more cores than previous top Coffee Lake CPU
  • 5GHz peak one-core clock for single-threaded apps
  • Unlocked multiplier
  • Great for multi-threaded applications.
  • Best price-performance ratio
  • Great memory and cache performance
  • Improved overclocking margins
  • Lots of motherboard choice
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
  • Price
  • Limited overclocking headroom
Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 12-core, 24-thread unlocked desktop processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 9 3900X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
High-end CPU segment
Cores
12 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.6 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Superb price-for-performance ratio in multithreaded scenarios
  • Relatively low power consumption
  • Easy overclocking tools
  • Huge L3 cache.
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
Intel Core i9 i9-9900K Octa-core (8 Core) 3.60 GHz Processor - Socket H4 LGA-1151 - Retail Pack - 8 GT/s DMI - 64-bit Processing - 5 GHz Overclocking Speed - 14 nm - 3 Number of Monitors Supported - I
Model
Intel Core i9 i9-9900K
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Intel
Performance category
High-end CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 5.0 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2018
Max. RAM
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Two more cores than previous top Coffee Lake CPU
  • 5GHz peak one-core clock for single-threaded apps
  • Unlocked multiplier
  • Great for multi-threaded applications.
Cons
  • Price
Best Price-Performance Ratioi
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
Test Result
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Best price-performance ratio
  • Great memory and cache performance
  • Improved overclocking margins
  • Lots of motherboard choice
Cons
  • Limited overclocking headroom

Finding the Best CPUs for Counter Strike: GO (CS:GO)

Go! Go! Go! – What began before the turn of the millennium as a mod for Half-Life and led to the fact that people used their 17-inch CRT monitors for strength training on weekends when they dragged their PCs to the nearest LAN, is currently culminating in CS:GO, one of the most successful eSports titles of all time. The game principle of “Terrorists” against “Counter-Terrorists”, which has been in existence since the beta phase and which fights for dominance in different game modes on different maps round after round, is enthusing millions of players worldwide. The versions CS 1.6, CS:S (a port to the source engine) and finally CS:GO can be considered milestones in the development of Counter-Strike.

Counter-Strike has evolved, both in the area of graphic effects and the physics engine, but some things have remained the same: you still buy the weapon of your choice from an arsenal of weapons at the beginning of the round and engage in pixel-shooting with the opposing team. Tactical elements during the time-limited rounds are provided by items such as smoke, blinding and HE grenades, in addition to the level building. But no matter whether you are able to finish off your opponents from a distance with the AWP, are prepared for all situations with the AK-47 or the M4-Carbine or are looking for a quick confrontation with the P90: the better the PC, the more advantages you have!

When choosing the right CPU for Counter Strike GO, make sure that it is compatible with the socket of the mainboard. In addition, 8-core CPUs with a clock rate of 3 GHz are recommended for an optimal gaming experience in CSGO. It is also essential that the processor is always well kept at a moderate temperature by its own CPU cooler. If you use a high-quality water cooling system, it is also possible to overclock the cores of the CPU to get more performance out of them. We tested three top CPUs at different price points that are very well suited for CS:GO.

Test Results: Best CPUs for Counter Strike: GO (CS:GO)

Ranking First: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

Pros

  • Strong single and multi-core performance
  • High efficiency
  • Compatible with old mainboards
  • Solid price-performance ratio

Cons

  • No integrated graphics unit

Best performing CPU for Counter Strike: Global Offenisve

With Zen 2 alias “Matisse” AMD says goodbye to the old Zeppelin die structure on the chip and splits the tasks into several parts: Three components are located on the silicon of the R9 3900X. Two of them are so-called chiplets. The nuclei of the Ryzen live here – a maximum of eight per chipplet, divided into clusters of four. The cache near the CPU is also located in the chipplets. Both chipplets communicate with the IO-Die via the “Infinity Fabric” data bus (“IO” stands for “in/out”). This in turn takes care of data transfer to the rest of the PC, memory management and also transfers information between the chipplets.

The chipplets are also the epitome of AMD’s current pride in the number 7 – which is why the processors also appear on 7.7. The cores are manufactured with a structure width of 7 nanometers. The Ryzen 2000 series was still produced with 12 nanometers. The miniaturization allows a CPU manufacturer to either shrink a die to make it more efficient or to put more processing units on the same surface.

For the user, the new structure does not change anything at first. In fact, Matisse brings hardly anything new in terms of pure functionality – except that the AMD CPUs are the first to introduce PCI-Express 4.0 into consumer platforms. However, the performance advantages of the wider data bus (512 instead of 256 bits) are currently manageable for normal users – for example, graphics cards are not expected to exhaust the gigantic bandwidth in the near future. But there’s nothing wrong with a lot of room for improvement. And PCIe 4.0 SSDs can be faster than their older counterparts.

By the way, the CPU still fits into the AM4 socket and can be overclocked with most motherboard chipsets. So if you are still satisfied with your first-generation Ryzen board and the manufacturer offers updates, you can still stick with your old board.

Hardly any weaknesses

When it comes to benchmark results in a table, there has seldom been a more exciting comparison than the current one between the R9 and Intel’s i9. Not because it’s a neck-and-neck race, but because the differences are simply brutal: AMD is a good 21 percent ahead of Intel’s eight-core top model. The top values are clearly above that: In multi-core rendering with Cinebench, for example, almost 45 percent, in encryption with TrueCrypt 44 percent, x265 encoding around 39 percent. The results are pressed by a few low-flying aircraft, which “only” operate at eye level with the i9: The old PCMark 8, Cinebench with only one processor thread (Ryzen 2 percent worse), and large spreadsheets in Excel (Ryzen 8 percent worse).

The Ryzen 9 3900X will also be interesting for gaming: In combination with an Nvidia GTX 1080, it beats the competitor model in the benchmark suites Fire Strike and Time Spy by two to six percent.

All benchmark results in comparison to the Intel Core i9-9900K can be found in the following table. By the way: A drilled version with 16 cores, the 3950X, is also supposed to follow.

Ryzen 9 is not a power guzzler

AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

A typical way to get more power out of the CPU is to increase the power consumption. In our measurements with a 250 watt fan (TDP), however, there is hardly any difference between the top CPUs from AMD and Intel. In PCMark 10 the system power consumption comes to 234 and 350 watts, depending on the test scenario. In return, the Intel system reaches marginally lower 233 and 348 watts. Even if you consider the different mainboards and their possibly different power consumption, the differences between the processors are negligible. So AMD has not saved on efficiency.

The secret lies in the IPC

There is a big difference between AMD and Intel: the clock frequency. While Intel has cracked the 5 GHz, the Ryzen Boost just manages to get to 4.6 GHz. So the higher performance can only come from a monstrously improved IPC (Instructions per Cycle). AMD lists a number of changes here that, taken together, should contribute to the additional 15% IPC that the manufacturer claims compared to the previous generation.

Most obvious is the increased L3 cache. 64 MByte of CPU-like memory are now available. The improved AVX2 support is also exciting – the CPU now processes corresponding data twice as fast. Furthermore the chip improves the jump prediction of instructions, gets a larger micro-op cache and a more associative L1 cache.

AMD Ryzen 9 3900X

The last two improvements are a bit more vivid: first, the so-called thread grouping. In Zen 2, processor threads, i.e. tasks of the executing programs, prefer to end up in the same chiplet and there in the same computing cluster rather than at different ends of the processor. This might be a better solution especially for the spatially separated chipplets.

Memory: AMD has given the Infinity Fabric, i.e. the CPU data bus, more freedom in terms of clocking. This should remove an old bottleneck – nevertheless, according to AMD there is a “sweet spot” with DDR4-3733. If you want to save a little money without significant performance losses, you should go for DDR4-3600 (CL16). Unfortunately, we haven’t been able to test how different data rates affect the performance so far.

Finally, there is one thing you shouldn’t forget when it comes to CPU performance: AMD does without an integrated graphics unit in the higher class desktop processors. If Intel were to omit this, there would be more space available for CPU tasks. However, an integrated graphics unit can sometimes also bring significant advantages in benchmarks.

Verdict: Best performing CPU for Counter Strike: Global Offenisve

AMD’s Ryzen 9 3900X turns out to be a wonder CPU in the test. The twelve-core processor beats the direct competition in many tests with flying colors, is efficient and at the same time only slightly more expensive. This also means that Intel’s last stronghold, the consumer high-end, has fallen. No matter whether you are a gamer or high-end user: there is hardly a reason not to go for the 3900X. All in all the Ryzen 9 3900X is the Best performing CPU for Counter Strike: Global Offenisve.

Ranking Second: Intel Core i9 9900K

Intel Core i9 9900K

Pros

  • High single thread performance
  • Unlocked multipliers
  • Efficient at low and medium load

Cons

  • Price

Great CPU performance for CSGO at a high price

It took a long time until Intel presented a response to AMD’s second generation of Ryzen. The competitors must have been pleased, after all the market share could finally be noticeably increased and pressure was built up. The Core i7-8700K couldn’t defend much more than the title of the fastest desktop gaming CPU – and in many cases only very narrowly. After all, AMD could only narrow the gap to Intel in the still important category of single-thread performance, and there is still no level playing field. Conversely, the first 8-core processor in this segment raised the bar for multi-thread performance.

Accordingly, the question arises above all whether the Core i9-9900K can catch up on its part thanks to two additional cores. The answer is a resounding yes. In comparison to the Core i7-8700K, the new processor offers a significantly higher multi-thread performance, which is not only due to the two additional cores, but also to the higher clock rates. If all threads are used, the plus is partly up to 40%, more often still 25 to 30%. A prerequisite for this, however, is that the respective software makes optimum use of all cores and threads. If this is not the case, the lead shrinks to 5 to 8% – in this case the higher clock rate is primarily responsible for the additional performance, because a higher IPC could not be observed.

However, this not only applies to synthetic benchmarks such as Cinebench 15 and AIDA64 and productive applications such as Blender and POV-ray, but also to games. Depending on how well the respective engine scales, the increase is between about 5 and 20 %. The actual performance increase can thus be higher than the values published by Intel itself. This is because the manufacturer speaks of a performance increase of up to about 10 % for its selected titles.

Intel Core i9 9900K

As Intel is most likely not aimed at users of a Core i7-8700K or similarly old processors, the comparison with AMD’s direct competitor is more important. If you orientate yourself by the number of cores and the market segment, the competitor is clearly called Ryzen 7 2700X.

The Core i9-9900K clearly wins the comparison when viewed objectively. The new Intel processor offers up to 25% higher single-thread performance in many typical applications, while AMD is only in a few cases – and then mostly only just – ahead. But even in the previous parade role, the Ryzen 7 2700X falls behind. Because thanks to the higher clock rates, the Core i9-9900K often passes even when all cores and threads are used. Although the lead is then generally smaller, it is unmissable.

And Intel is also ahead when it comes to energy consumption. The Core i9-9900K needs less energy under low to medium load than the Ryzen 7 2700X. But beyond that, the tide turns; AMD’s representative gets by with 8% less under full load. In opposition to this, however, there is more performance.

The increase in performance and the overtaking of the Ryzen 7 2700X should not hide the fact that there is still some catching up to do in some areas. For example, the official RAM support is limited to only DDR4-2666, and although the effects of faster bars are rather small in everyday use, an additional one or two percentage points are wasted – which does not change the fact that faster memory can be used. And even the integrated graphics unit, which is weak on paper, shouldn’t play a role for many users. The UHD Graphics 630 still offers enough performance for office and co., and for everything else the Core i9-9900K should be paired with a powerful graphics card anyway.

Intel Core i9 9900K

On the other hand, it’s uncertain how large the group of those who wanted a high OC potential is. It’s clear, however, that there has been almost no progress in this regard in comparison to Coffee Lake. More than 5.1 GHz on all cores simultaneously could not be elicited from the processor – the same value as on the Core i7-8086K and only 100 MHz more than on the Core i7-8700K. Perhaps more annoying is therefore that OC enthusiasts will probably not be able to avoid replacing the motherboard, or the purchase of the most expensive boards is mandatory. Although Intel promises full compatibility also for mainboards with the Z370 chipset, they are not designed for the operation of the eight-core beyond the stick clock in terms of power supply – keyword VRM.

Another point, however, can only be included in the evaluation to a limited extent at this point in time. Intel still hasn’t managed to provide a non-binding price recommendation for the Core i9-9900K. In the USA, 488 US dollars are called up for the purchase of 1,000 units, in the best case between 500 and 520 US dollars are called up in the trade there. In this country, however, the trader listings start at just under 700 Euros – AMD’s Ryzen 7 2700X costs less than half of that with around 300 Dollar. Currently, the direct competitor could thus also be called Ryzen Threadripper 2920X, which will offer twelve cores for a small surcharge. But even based on the US-UVP, the Core i9-9900K is anything but a bargain or price-performance tip. Because for an average of 10 to 15% more performance, Intel demands a surcharge of 35%.

Verdict: Great CPU performance for CSGO at a high price

The eight-core is therefore only interesting for those whose gaming PC already contains extremely powerful and expensive hardware such as a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti. Here, the much too high price is hardly noticeable. Buyers can also be sure to own the currently second fastest gaming CPU, which also belongs to the top class in many productive applications. Everyone else will be happier with a Ryzen 7 2700X or even a Ryzen Threadripper 1920X. The latter offers a comparable performance on average, but costs only 400 Dollar. All in all, the i9 9900K offers great CPU performance for CSGO at a high price.

Ranking Third: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

Pros

  • High performance
  • 65 watts TDP only
  • Best price-performance ratio

Cons

  • Single-thread performance slightly behind competition

Best price-performance ratio CPU for CSGO and Gaming in general

With Zen 2 alias “Matisse” AMD says goodbye to the old Zeppelin die structure on the chip and splits the tasks into several parts: Up to three components sit on the silicon of the Ryzen 3000 series. Two of them are so-called chiplets. These are the nuclei of the Ryzen – a maximum of eight per chipplet, divided into clusters of four. The cache near the CPU is also located in the chipplets. Both chipplets communicate with the IO-Die via the “Infinity Fabric” data bus (“IO” stands for “in/out”). This in turn takes care of data transfer to the rest of the PC, memory management and also transfers information between the chipplets.

The chipplets are also the epitome of AMD’s current pride in the number 7 – which is why the processors also appear on 7.7. The cores are manufactured with a structure width of 7 nanometers. The Ryzen 2000 series was still produced with 12 nanometers. The miniaturization allows a CPU manufacturer to either shrink a die to make it more efficient or to put more processing units on the same surface.

For the user, the new structure does not change anything at first. In fact, Matisse brings hardly anything new in terms of pure functionality – except that the AMD CPUs are the first to introduce PCI-Express 4.0 into consumer platforms. However, the performance advantages of the wider data bus (512 instead of 256 bits) are currently manageable for normal users – for example, graphics cards are not expected to exhaust the gigantic bandwidth in the near future. But there’s nothing wrong with air to the top. And PCIe 4.0 SSDs can be faster than their older counterparts.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

By the way, the CPU still fits into the AM4 socket and can be overclocked with most motherboard chipsets. So if you are still satisfied with your first-generation Ryzen board and the manufacturer offers updates, you can still stick with your old board.

Get it all out

With a price point of around 350 Dollar, you should think that the direct competitor would be the Intel Core i7-9700K. After all, both CPUs have eight cores, whereby the 3700X supports simultaneous multithreading and thus 16 threads simultaneously, whereas the Intel processor doesn’t. However, the benchmarks show that not only the current flagship – the Ryzen 9 3900X – but also its little sister CPU is boxing against the Intel Core i9-9900K with eight cores and 16 threads. The performance is often at least on par, and often the 130 euro cheaper CPU even wins.

In comparison, highlights can be seen in the everyday simulation PCMark 10 (R7: 4,150 points, i9: 3,800 points), raytracing (R7: 4,350 points, i9: 4,250 points) and synthetic gaming benchmarks with the support of an Nvidia GTX 1080. AMD scores 20,200 points in 3DMark Fire Strike, Intel only 19,900 points. In 3DMark Time Spy the difference is even a bit bigger: 8,050 points against 7,700 points.

In many tests, however, the two CPUs are almost equal. Intel takes the speed victory in large spreadsheets and compresses data faster. The i9 is also clearly in front in single thread mode in the Cinebench render benchmark.

AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

But as already mentioned: at this price difference, it is a fantastic performance that the AMD chip can keep up with Intel. All benchmark results of our tests can be found in the following table.

Ryzen 7 with good efficiency

The Ryzen 7 is also not compromised in terms of power consumption. In the benchmark suite PCMark 10, our test system needs 232 watts or 331 watts, depending on the scenario. The extended test is especially interesting here, as the overall performance is thus 17 watts below the Core i9 and 19 watts below the Ryzen 9.

You have to keep in mind, however, that we have to use different mainboards per manufacturer, of course, which in turn influence the power consumption. All in all, it can at least be said that AMD hasn’t saved on efficiency.

Verdict: Best price-performance ratio CPU for CSGO and Gaming

If you want a lot of performance for CSGO and Gaming in general at an outstanding price, you don’t have to wait any longer: The Ryzen 7 3700X offers excellent results across all benchmarks and still remains efficient. At the same time, the eight-core with 4.4 GHz outperforms Intel’s i7-9700K and even the flagship i9-9900K. As the price is super fair the Ryzen 7 3700X wins our best price-performance ratio award.

Ultimate Guide – How to improve in Counter Strike: Global Offensive (CS:GO)

Practice makes perfect! The standard saying of every coach applies to football, tennis and cycling as well as billiards, chess and CS:GO. So if you want to get better at Valves Tactical Shooter, you’ll need to practice regularly. But how do you really practice Counter-Strike?

An ex-pro tells Reddit three steps that should make you a better Counter-Striker. Three core competencies are equally important: shooting, situation awareness and movement.

Step 1: Train your Aiming!

Logically, without shooter skills you won’t see any country in CS:GO. Accordingly, you have to train your precision and reflexes to finish your opponents faster than they can blow you out of the water.

In order to be able to aim and shoot better, the ex-professional recommends playing the community map Aim Botz every day. Start the map in offline mode in a private game. The map can be configured to your training needs. The ex-pro suggests you shoot 1337 bots every day and stop your time to get faster and faster.

It is important that you are able to shoot precise single shots as well as control the recoil pattern of all important weapons. To internalize the patterns, the ex-professional recommends the training map Recoil Master.

Here you start a training session by practising precise single shots. If this works well, try to apply two-shot salvos accurately. If this also works smoothly, practice three shots in a row. Continue until you can fire long bursts and the bullets land as close together as possible.

Later, you will crown your training by playing CS Deathmatch against real players. Train all the weapons you would buy in a real match. Don’t forget pistols and MPs for the sparring rounds!

So how can I improve my CS GO aim in different areas?

Precision

The most important thing here is the optimal setting of your Crooshair. It must be neither too large nor too small and must be clearly visible on all surfaces. Ideally you should be able to abaim every part of your opponent’s body from any distance. You will also need to find the best mouse sensitivity for you. If your mouse sensitivity is too high, accuracy or precision will suffer, but if it is too low, you will not be able to react quickly enough. You should generally use about all of your mouse pad for a complete rotation around the axis if you use one. The fine tuning works by targeting an object in the map and trying to keep the crosshair on it while moving.

Response/Reaction

On the one hand your general reflexes but also the mouse sensitivity play a role. On certain Aim Maps you can practice your reaction but also the accuracy. For a good reaction the mouse speed must be fast enough. But make sure that it is not too high.

Movement

The Movement plays a role in improving your Aiming in so far as each weapon warps in motion and does not shoot as accurately as when stationary. Therefore you should always stop to shoot. It is important to find the right rhythm between standing and shooting and your movement. Above all, you should be unpredictable in your movement, so don’t always move in the same direction and run towards your opponent quickly (rush) and surprise him, sneak away etc. If you are standing at corners or edges and look around the corner to the left or right, you can compensate this movement with a short press on the opposite key and your shot counts as if you were standing still. With such a sidestep you can aim much more precisely. Of course it is also important where you stand. Always stand in such a way that you can be covered from as many sides as possible at the same time.

Spray Control

When stationary, every weapon has a certain spray pattern, i.e. a pattern according to which it distributes (sprays) the shots. This can be compensated by countering in continuous fire. Every weapon moves upwards. In addition, the guns move to the left or right. If you learn to control the spray, you will be able to kill the enemy much easier in continuous fire. However, you should only use this in close combat, as single shots or 2-3 shots at medium distances are much more accurate and effective. Then try to aim at the head. Spraying does not help at all at such high distances.

Get better in CS GO

Besides the Aiming there are of course some other factors with which you can become better in CS GO permanently. However, it is important that you play Aim Maps regularly and learn not only your reaction but also the precision and spray pattern of your weapons. A good knowledge of maps is also very important, so that you know where enemies can appear and where they like to be. Only when you have mastered all this you should think about team tactics and occupy the right positions on the maps. In the game with your team it is also important to know the names of certain places on the map so that everyone knows immediately where an enemy has been sighted.

Step 2: Train to read the game correctly!

Shooting is only half the battle in a tactical shooter. You also need to be able to read the course of a round and make the right decisions to have the right answer at hand in various situations.

Here the ex-professional recommends a simple trick to improve your situational awareness: Watch pros! Counter-Strike: Global Offensive offers ingame the possibility to download and view the game history of other players.

Then you can watch the pros from a first-person perspective, see how they react in certain situations and learn from them for your own game. You should also look at your own replays to see what mistakes you can avoid in the future.

Step 3: Train the movement!

Once you have trained your right hand (shooting) and your brain (situation awareness), only your left hand (movement) is missing to include all CS muscle groups in your training. Here the ex-professional recommends special community maps, which deal with the topic Movement. We have chosen two categories for you:

Jump Training: In this community map you can train how to use jumps correctly. This includes important places for bunnyhopping and long jumps to get to difficult to reach places.

Surf Maps: There are now a huge selection of these maps, which are designed to help you master long slides and train your movement gameplay accordingly.

9 Tips to improve in CS:GO

1. Reduce your DPI

Most pros play at 400 DPI. Even though this may seem slow at first, your aim will improve in the long run. With a lower speed, you become more precise, smoother and more consistent in your Aim.

It’s not without reason that almost all pros and streamers across all shooters choose 400 DPI as their mouse speed of choice. Of course you should adjust the speed in the game individually. 400 DPI as a basis is a good choice.

2. Learn Callouts

CSGO is a very tactical game and requires good teamwork. For every meter of a map there is a specific name that you should be able to use. On the one hand to be able to process calls of your team and on the other hand to be able to give them yourself.

Only through good communication with your team you will be able to win and move up. Fortunately there are several pros and streamers who have videos with the most important callouts for the most important maps.

3. Budget with money

This point may sound surprising at first, but CSGO is very different from other shooters in one respect: the economy.

At the end of each round, no matter if you win or lose, you get money. Depending on how your performance was and whether you won or lost, it is more or less. You can spend this money at the beginning of the round on weapons, equipment and grenades. Sometimes it is worth saving for a round and fighting with only one pistol.

In the next round you can buy better equipment. It is important to know that if you survive, you can take your gun with you to the next round.

4. Using grenades correctly

If you really want to get better at CSGO, you need to know all the useful places to throw smoke and flash grenades. Fortunately, you won’t be left alone here either, because there are endless videos that show you the right places to throw grenades.

Of course there are not only fixed places where you should throw grenades. Often you have to use grenades spontaneously in battles, but even for this you can find the necessary inspiration online.

5. The right weapons

Of course you can shoot with all weapons in CSGO. But if you look at professional players and games in high rankings, you will see the same weapons in use again and again.

You should use these weapons yourself to get security in the scatter and crosshair control. On the side of the terrorists this is undoubtedly the AK-47. As anti-terrorists you should learn the M4A4.

And then there is the legendary AWP. Usually there is only one AWP player per team and this sniper rifle probably needs more practice than any other weapon. But it is also absolutely deadly in the hands of a master.

6. Correct reloading

Reloading takes its time in CSGO, so you should not reload directly after every shot fired while there are still enemies nearby. If the magazine is empty, it is usually more worthwhile to switch to the pistol than to reload.

The pistol is easier to handle and with a little practice you can kill your opponent very quickly with a handgun.

7. Do not get tilted!

On your way to the top of the rank, you will have to deal with hackers, trolls or simply bad team members. It’s frustrating, of course, but if you don’t get over it, it will be difficult to play consistently well.

Things that you can’t influence shouldn’t make you angry. At the end of the day, only your own gameplay suffers.

Most importantly, you shouldn’t take your anger out on the team members, because they usually don’t play better then. If a team member yells in your ear or spams the chat, it’s best to be brave and just keep going.

8. Play Deathmatch

This tip should be taken with caution, as the most important and popular game mode is of course Bomb, and too much Deathmatch can change your behaviour in Bomb to the negative in terms of tactics.

But especially for practicing weapons or getting used to new settings Deathmatch can be very helpful. Without the waiting times from Bomb you have continuous action in Deathmatch, where you can train reaction times and mechanics.

9. Learn from the Pro’s

CSGO has a huge community. Many esport Pro’s, but also simply big streamers, which cause a sensation in the ranked ladder. So it’s worth taking a look at YouTube or Twitch to get better in CSGO.

Some people argue that only hours actively invested by oneself will help the player. We don’t think so. You can learn a lot from the pros, but then you have to implement it yourself.


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