3 Best Graphics Cards (GPU) for PUBG in 2020

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Winner
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition Graphics Card
PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB GDDR6 Graphics Card
Best Price
ASUS ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT OC Edition Gaming Graphics Card (PCIe 4.0, 6GB, GDDR6 Memory, HDMI, DisplayPort, Axial-tech Fan Design, Metal Backplate (ROG-STRIX-RX5600XT-O6G-GAMING)
Model
GeForce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition
Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT
ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT OC
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Test Result 9.4/10 Very Good June 2020
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
Nvidia
PowerColor
Asus
Performance
Video Memory
8 GB GDDR6
8 GB GDDR6
6 GB GDDR6
Clock rate
1650 MHz (1815 MHz OC)
1770 MHz (2010 MHz OC)
1400 MHz (1750 MHz OC)
Memory bandwidth
495.9 GB/s
448.0 GB/s
288.0 GB/s
Displayport
HDMI
Value for money
Pros
  • High speed 4K, WQHD and Full HD gaming
  • Many Ports (3 display ports, 1 HDMI, 1 USB type C)
  • Very Silent + Great Cooling
  • Good Gaming Performance in PUBG (Best Quality settings)
  • Best Price
  • Silent while Gaming
  • Good Beginners Graphics Card for PUBG
  • Cheap Price
  • Silent while Gaming
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Slightly high power consumption
  • Not Great for 4K Gaming / VR
Recommended by us?
Winner
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition Graphics Card
Model
GeForce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Manufacturer
Nvidia
Performance
Video Memory
8 GB GDDR6
Clock rate
1650 MHz (1815 MHz OC)
Memory bandwidth
495.9 GB/s
Displayport
HDMI
Value for money
Pros
  • High speed 4K, WQHD and Full HD gaming
  • Many Ports (3 display ports, 1 HDMI, 1 USB type C)
  • Very Silent + Great Cooling
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended by us?
PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB GDDR6 Graphics Card
Model
Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT
Test Result
Test Result 9.4/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
PowerColor
Performance
Video Memory
8 GB GDDR6
Clock rate
1770 MHz (2010 MHz OC)
Memory bandwidth
448.0 GB/s
Displayport
HDMI
Value for money
Pros
  • Good Gaming Performance in PUBG (Best Quality settings)
  • Best Price
  • Silent while Gaming
Cons
  • Slightly high power consumption
Recommended by us?
Best Price
ASUS ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT OC Edition Gaming Graphics Card (PCIe 4.0, 6GB, GDDR6 Memory, HDMI, DisplayPort, Axial-tech Fan Design, Metal Backplate (ROG-STRIX-RX5600XT-O6G-GAMING)
Model
ROG Strix AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT OC
Test Result
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
Asus
Performance
Video Memory
6 GB GDDR6
Clock rate
1400 MHz (1750 MHz OC)
Memory bandwidth
288.0 GB/s
Displayport
HDMI
Value for money
Pros
  • Good Beginners Graphics Card for PUBG
  • Cheap Price
  • Silent while Gaming
Cons
  • Not Great for 4K Gaming / VR
Recommended by us?

We Reviewed and Selected the Best Graphics Cards (GPUs) for PUBG (Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds) in terms of Gaming Performance, Cooling Power, Price and more.

Above you can see the Ranking with the results of the test and below you will find more info about PUBG and the in-depth reports of each Graphics card.

Guide: PUBG

Best Graphics Cards (GPU) for PUBG in 2020

When Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds was first released on 23 March 2016 in the form of an early-access version, probably no one could have guessed that the title would soon after and during the early-access phase attract an audience of millions. Currently, PUBG, the hardly less bulky abbreviation, leads the steam charts and has even ousted eternal perennial favourites like Counterstrike or DOTA 2 from the top positions.

This popularity is quite understandable when playing: PUBG allows for a high dynamic from round to round due to the approximately 64 km² maps, the random positioning of weapons and objects as well as the multitude of players and their starting points.

Every game runs at least a little bit differently, you get different weapon pickups and upgrades and meet other players with also different equipment. You can play cautiously or aggressively, hunt down opponents or hide from them – and you can succeed with any of your tactics.

As you battle with other players against other teams, you’ll also need to coordinate with each other, assign roles and missions, and position your team tactically.

The game principle is therefore quite exciting and entertaining. But strictly speaking, PUBG is not an overly innovative new idea, but rather an evolution of old-fashioned free-for-all and team-based tactical shooters with last-man-standing-victory conditions and a light open-world touch.

The Battle Royale genre, which includes PUBG, Fortnite and Co., who founded the genre in principle, also existed in a very similar form before – among others as the mod for Arma 3, which marks the origin of PUBG.

Nevertheless, PUBG is a gigantic success, which should also find a lot of imitators in the near future. Steam is already being flooded with obvious PUBG clones, moreover quite a few titles get Battle Royale modes or spin-offs, among them Epic’s Fortnite, the hero shooter Paladins, Ark: Survival of the Fittest, H1Z1: King of the Hill, Minecraft: The Hunger Games or Grand Theft Auto Online: Motor Wars.

With the continuing success of PUBG, it’s no wonder that others want to jump on the profitable trend – although a certain saturation of the player base could quickly creep in:

If, in addition to hundreds of unfinished early access survival sandboxes and MOBA hero-shooter mixes (the last two trends running in parallel), just as many and at least as many unfinished, but hardly distinguishable Battle Royale shooters will soon be competing for the favour of the players, a few isolated successful top titles are likely to emerge.

Here PUBG could have an advantage and even be able to expand on it, because the game is not only one of the – if not the founder – of the Battle Royale genre, PUBG also has a certain amount of development time behind it.

New content has been added and of course Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds has a very clear advantage in terms of player numbers and public perception.

Ranking First: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super review


Pros

  • High speed 4K, WQHD and Full HD gaming
  • Many Ports (3 display ports, 1 HDMI, 1 USB type C)
  • Very Silent + Great Cooling

Cons

  • Expensive

With the Geforce RTX 2080 Super in the test, Nvidia releases the third and for the time being last super model of the Turing series after the RTX 2070 Super and RTX 2060 Super.

The 2080 Super positions itself against the old RTX 2080, which is currently sold out due to the release of the RTX 2070 Super. In the comparison 2080 Super vs. RTX 2080 Ti the clearly more expensive 2080 Ti remains the fastest graphics card for gamers.

Simultaneously with the publication of this review, the release and sale of the RTX 2080 Super will also take place on July 23, 2019. Interested parties can choose between the 2080 Super Founders Edition reference card and various 2080 Super custom designs from many manufacturers.

Features

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super test

Compared to the normal Geforce RTX 2080, the successor with super addition also relies on the TU104 graphics chip, but offers more shader and texture units as well as higher clock rates. We have listed the most important differences of the RTX 2080 Super below:

  • Higher chip clock rates: 1.650 MHz (Boost 1.815 MHz) instead of 1.515 MHz (Boost 1.710 MHz)
  • Higher VRAM clock: effective 15.5 GHz instead of 14 GHz
  • More shader and texture units: 3,072 and 192 instead of 2,944 and 184
  • Increased power consumption (TDP): 250 instead of 215 watts (Custom Designs) or 225 watts (Founders Edition)

The Geforce RTX 2080 Super has a higher raw performance than the normal RTX 2080, which, together with the attracted chip and video memory clock rates, makes it a few percentage points faster in games, like PUBG.

As with all Super models, the RTX 2080 Super increases the number of RT and Tensor cores relevant for raytracing and DLSS edge smoothing compared to the old 2080 variant. However, you should not hope for a significant difference in performance in the respective application scenario due to the very small increase.

Gaming Performance

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super tact frequence

As expected, the Geforce RTX 2080 Super places itself in second place in our graphics card ranking behind the 2080 Ti and is on average a good eight percent faster than the old RTX 2080 Founders Edition, which Nvidia delivered overclocked ex works in contrast to the new Super variant – custom designs of the RTX 2080 Super should be correspondingly a bit faster.

The Geforce RTX 2080 Ti clearly remains on the performance throne, but with the RTX 2080 Super it gets the strongest competitor so far. In WQHD resolution the 2080 Ti has a lead of about ten percent, in UHD the overclocked 2080 Ti Founders Edition can then stand out more clearly by 17 percent from the 2080 Super.

In the comparison RTX 2070 super vs. RTX 2080 super the 2080 super can claim a comfortable projection of approximately 15 per cent for itself – however at a surcharge of nearly 40 per cent.

The bottom line is that the Geforce RTX 2080 Super is a very fast graphics card, which can smoothly display PUBG in UHD resolution with maximum details and very often break through 60 fps.

Benchmarks

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super review

The Geforce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition clocks with an average of around 1,900 MHz in our gaming benchmarks. Therewith, it slightly outperforms its already overclocked predecessor as a reference model: We have determined an average clock rate of about 1,860 MHz for the RTX 2080 FE.

Noise levels, temperature and power consumption

There are no surprises in the cooling design of the Geforce RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition. The two reference cards (Super and Non-Super) have identical dimensions, are two slots high and use axial cooling with two 90 mm fans.

However, the fans of the RTX 2080 Super, like the two other Super models RTX 2070 Super and RTX 2060 Super, rotate at increased speeds compared to their predecessors.

In idle mode, the fan speed is 1,500 revolutions per minute, under load 2,020 revolutions per minute. Nvidia might want to counteract the somewhat higher TDP (Thermal Design Power) with that.

Thus, the RTX 2080 Super FE is a bit louder in comparison to the normal RTX 2080 FE – both in Windows mode and in PUBG. While it still works relatively unobtrusively in idle mode with 39.6 decibels, the fans turn up quite audibly in load scenarios with 42.6 decibels.

The chip is also sufficiently well cooled at all times. We measured a temperature of 75 degrees in PUBG with our open test system, and 32 degrees in idle.

The power consumption increases only slightly, despite the TDP of 250 watts. We measured 318 watts for the overclocked predecessor. The new RTX 2080 Super Founders Edition needs 323 watts (entire test system without TFT).

Verdict

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Super pc build

The Geforce RTX 2080 Super in the test completes Nvidia’s super trio. Once again, the focus is on more performance at a lower price, because apart from the slightly increased tech specs, only the highest effective GDDR6 clock rate to date (15.5 GHz) stands out in the 2080 Super.

As expected, the RTX 2080 Founders Edition performed somewhat faster than the RTX 2080, but still maintains a sufficiently high gap to the Geforce RTX 2080 Ti, which only really comes into its own in UHD resolution and remains by far the fastest (and most expensive) gaming graphics card.

Compared to the RTX 2070 super the RTX 2080 super can maintain a projection of approximately 15 per cent for itself, is at the same time with a noncommittal price recommendation of $850 in addition, nearly 40 per cent more expensive – a clear surcharge per fps.

Altogether Nvidia increases the performance of the old 2080 with the new RTX 2080 Super and lowers the price at the same time, however the added value for buyers seems greater with the 2080 Super than with 2070 Super and 2060 Super, which is why the RTX 2080 Super is Ranking First on the Best Graphics cards for PUBG.

Ranking Second: PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT review


Pros

  • Good Gaming Performance in PUBG (Best Quality settings)
  • Best price
  • Silent while Gaming

Cons

  • Slightly high power consumption

PowerColor is going full steam ahead with the Navi-10 top model Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil and relies on a massive cooler, a new RGB lighting and two different BIOS versions.

Even on paper, the model has what it takes to be the best custom navigation graphics card. The price also speaks for it.

With the Radeon RX 5700 and Radeon RX 5700 XT, AMD has successfully taken its own graphics card portfolio into the next generation. RDNA works significantly better than the veteran GCN.

However, one thing has remained the same: the noisy reference cooler. And so many interested parties have been waiting for the so-called custom designs.

Features

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT design

PowerColor installs a newly developed cooler on the Radeon RX 5700 XT. This is about 2.5 slots high and turns out very long with 30.5 cm. Added to this is a height of a decent 13.6 cm. So there is a lot of space and volume for the cooler, which the manufacturer makes good use of.

Thus, two different aluminum heat sinks are built in, one of which is placed directly above the Navi-10-GPU. Both are connected by five heatpipes with a diameter of 6 mm.

For the necessary fresh air, three axial fans with a diameter of 85 mm are installed, which stop operation at low temperatures. The cooling system is rounded off by a backplate.

The Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil relies on a specially developed PCB, which is designed with a 10-phase power supply and two eight-pin power connectors for good overclocking success. The components should be able to handle about 300 watts without any problems. At 24 cm, the PCB is a good deal shorter than the cooler.

For the first time, PowerColor uses RGB lighting on the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil. Besides the Red Devil logo on the side of the cooler, other elements are also illuminated.

The RGB effect isn’t particularly spectacular, but the quality is ultimately comparable to the solutions of most other board partners, such as Asus’ Strix series. The lighting can be extensively configured with the help of the “Devil Zone” tool.

Monitors can be controlled via an HDMI 2.0b output and three DisplayPorts 1.4 (with DSC). The name “Red Devil” is stamped out on the slot bracket. That looks chic, but has a nasty catch: PowerColor has the name punched out the wrong way round, so that it stands upside down in a standard ATX case when installed.

The manufacturer has already made such a faux pas: On the Radeon RX 480 Red Devil even the logo on the side was upside down.

PowerColor installs two different BIOS versions on the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil, which show clear differences. By default the OC-Bios is active. Alternatively, the “Silent BIOS” can be selected by a large switch on the PCB.

With the OC-BIOS the GPU is allowed to work with up to 225 Watt. Furthermore, the fan control is optimized for low temperature development. With the Silent BIOS, however, only 185 watts are allowed.

In addition, the hardware is also allowed to become warmer, so that the fans operate significantly slower. The effects should not be underestimated, as the series of measurements on the next page will show.

Performance

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT PC setup

With navigation systems it is harder than ever to talk about fixed clock rates. For this reason, PowerColor’s specifications should not be considered set. According to the manufacturer, however, the applied frequencies should in any case increase noticeably compared to the reference.

PowerColor names a base clock of 1.770 MHz, while the PUBG clock is 1.905 MHz and the maximum turbo is 2.010 MHz. That would be 165 MHz, 155 MHz and 105 MHz more respectively than the reference design. The 8 GB GDDR6 memory is driven with the usual 7.000 MHz.

And how exactly does the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil differ from the Radeon RX 5700 XT in the reference design, the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC, the Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT Pulse and the XFX Radeon RX 5700 XT THICC2? The following table shows this at a glance.

AMD has made some changes to the fan control since Adrenalin 19.7.3, affecting all models of the Radeon RX 5700 and Radeon RX 5700 XT. In the custom graphics cards the change manifests itself with a too high fan speed under load.

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT test setup

However, with a modified BIOS it is possible to adjust the fan control independently of the driver used. The test sample of the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil was affected by exactly this problem.

However, before the launch, the manufacturer provided a modified BIOS that adapts the behavior of the fan controller independently of the driver. The adapted BIOS will be installed on all commercially available cards.

Benchmarks

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT test setup

With the high GPU power of 225 watts, the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil can achieve a correspondingly high clock rate.

On average, the red devil doesn’t give itself much away when the OC BIOS is activated and the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC, which isn’t surprising due to the identical GPU power.

In most games there is a tie, occasionally the Asus graphic card clocks slightly higher. Thus, the clock rate is between 1.866 MHz and 2.009 MHz in games.

Those who activate the silent BIOS have to do without clock: Now the graphic card works with 1.671 MHz to 1.871 MHz and clocks similar to the reference card.

This is obvious, because the GPU power is absolutely the same in this scenario with 185 watts each. Thus there are only small differences between the silent BIOS and the XFX Radeon RX 5700 XT THICC2, whose Navi 10 can also use up to 185 watts.

In comparison to the OC-BIOS, the clock rates drop by about 100 to 200 MHz.

With the factory OC-BIOS, the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil works 4 percent faster than the reference design.

Thus, the graphic card has to “admit defeat” by almost 1 percent of the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC, although both graphic cards have the identical GPU power of 225 watts.

The PowerColor model is thus 7 percent behind a GeForce RTX 2070 Super, while the “budget customers” of the navigation generation are beaten by 3 to 5 percent.

With the silent BIOS the maximum GPU power drops significantly to 185 watts and the frames per second turn out 4 percent lower.

As with the other partner cards, there is not enough power to keep up with AMD’s reference design despite identical GPU power. The standard card is almost one percent faster.

In PUBG, the difference between the OC and silent BIOS is between 4 and 6 percent. This depends on how much power the graphics card requires for the 3D engine used, like in PUBG.

Noise levels & Cooling

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT test

The OC BIOS is optimized for high performance and low temperatures, which does not benefit the noise level of the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil.

The graphic card is indeed quieter than the reference design with 42.5 decibels, but the “volume pairing” with the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC ultimately means a product that attracts a lot of attention during gaming.

However, the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil can also be almost whisper quiet.

With the Quiet BIOS, the graphics card transforms and lets the fans run at 1,370 instead of 2,000 revolutions per minute. With only 34 decibels left, the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is hardly noticeable during gaming – you have to listen pretty closely to hear the 3D accelerator.

The measured value is another 2 decibels lower than on the Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC with the Quiet BIOS, while the reference and other custom models of the navigation generation tested so far are considerably louder.

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil can be used in a Silent PC with the Silent BIOS without any problems. Comparably quiet graphics cards for PUBG are few and far between in this performance class and none from AMD.

Temperature

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT comparison

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is a cool graphics card for PUBG. With the factory BIOS, the Navi-10 GPU only heats up to 72 °C during gaming.

This means that the 3D accelerator remains cooler than all other representatives of the Radeon RX 5700 XT, with better performance at the same time. The junction temperature in PowerColor is a maximum of 96 °C, but the “memory sensor” – according to research by Igor’s Lab, however, it doesn’t have the right value or at least doesn’t report it correctly – shows 80 °C.

These are also record values for a Navi-10-XT product. This relativizes the identical volume level in comparison to the Asus Strix OC, because the GPU of the competition gets warmer.

The temperatures also stay low with the silent BIOS. The GPU then reaches a 5°C higher value with 77°C.

The junction temperature is even 2 °C cooler with 94 °C, while the memory sensor reports a plus of 8 °C with 88 °C. Even with the silent BIOS, the temperature values are still good.

Power Consumption

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT rgb colors

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil needs an average of 251 watts during gaming. This is 41 watts more than the reference design and 16 watts less than the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC. The energy hunger is reduced by 48 watts to 203 watts with the silent BIOS.

That’s 7 watts less than the reference card, which is consistent with the minimally lower clock rates. The graphics card for PUBG then operates in the same region as the other constellations with a GPU power of 185 watts, which comes to 201 and 207 watts.

The performance per watt ratio suffers with the OC BIOS due to the higher power consumption and the only slightly better performance. AMD’s reference design delivers 16 percent more FPS per watt.

With the silent BIOS, the situation changes: The PowerColor graphics card for PUBG now suddenly works 3 percent more efficiently. The difference in efficiency between the two BIOS versions is 18 percent on the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil.

On the Windows desktop, the PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil consumes a comparatively high 17 watts of energy. The reference design is satisfied with 8 watts less.

The Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC gets the same 17 watts. This shows that a power supply optimized for overclocking brings disadvantages for the idle consumption.

Overclocking

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil can hardly be overclocked. The GPU only allows a plus of 30 MHz, and the test pattern crashed immediately with a further increase.

The clock voltage curve shows 2.069 MHz at 1.198 volts in the WattMan by default. A maximum of 2,150 MHz (+81 MHz) is possible at the same voltage. The memory can be easily overclocked by the usual 600 MHz to 7,600 MHz.

The fact that the performance in games increases by 4 to 5 percent with the OC BIOS is primarily due to the higher power limit.

The Navi-10-GPU works in games with about 2,010 to 2,030 MHz. The cooler has no major problems with the higher power consumption. The temperatures rise only slightly, the same applies to the noise development.

Verdict

PowerColor Red Devil Radeon RX 5700 XT test benchmarks

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is not a perfect graphics card, but it is certainly a very good one for PUBG when using the silent BIOS. Then the PowerColor model delivers the speed of AMD’s reference card, but does its work very quietly in PUBG.

In this case, the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is also quieter than the Asus Radeon RX 5700 XT Strix OC with the Quiet BIOS, so that the graphics card is currently the quietest navigation custom card ever introduced, which is suitable for a silent PC without restrictions.

Because it still cools better, there is even potential for further manual improvements or hot summer days.

If you want more performance, you can use the factory active OC-BIOS. Then there is 4 percent more FPS than the reference design. The volume is then as high as with the Strix OC, which is even a touch faster, but the temperatures remain lower.

For most buyers, however, the OC BIOS will be too loud, especially since the advantages are primarily of a metrological nature – if custom Navi 10 design tests have shown one thing so far, it is that the GPU can hardly be overclocked relevantly even with high additional consumption.

However, the built-in cooler is sufficient for the Red Devil to find a middle way with an adapted fan control. Who likes to tinker something by himself can get the OC-BIOS without problems quieter.

Beside the new cooler, there is a “first time” for PowerColor on the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil with RGB lighting. This doesn’t come close to the quality of Gigabytes Aorus solution, but if you like light on the graphics card for PUB, you still get a decent variant.

The graphic card didn’t show any real weak points during testing. Potentially annoying is at most the upside down Red Devil logo on the slot bracket. This shouldn’t really happen to an experienced graphics card manufacturer.

Nevertheless, PowerColor delivers the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil, the most rounded package of all custom models tested so far.

Especially with the silent BIOS, the graphics card for PUBG knows how to please. The set price of $450, which is astonishingly low in view of the previously mentioned prices of other competitors, should also be positively mentioned.

The PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is absolutely worth the extra 50 Dollars compared to the reference design, Sapphire demands so much for the clearly inferior pulse. And Asus in all probability wants more than 100 Dollars more for the Strix OC.

With the performance shown, the Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil is a strong contender for the title “best custom design of the Radeon RX 5700 XT”, which is why it’s ranking second on the best Graphics Cards for PUBG.

The Radeon RX 5700 XT Red Devil also won our ‘Best Price’ category, so if you want a great graphics card for a low price, get this one!

Ranking Third: AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT review


Pros

  • Good Beginners Graphics Card for PUBG
  • Cheap Price
  • Silent while Gaming

Cons

  • Not Great for 4K Gaming / VR

The Radeon RX 5600 XT is technically a slimmed down Radeon RX 5700 (which in turn is a trimmed RX 5700 XT), with which AMD wants to serve the price segment up to 300 Dollars. A new GPU is therefore not used.

All RX-5000 GPUs are based on AMD’s RDNA architecture, which was launched in July 2019, and come off the production line at Taiwan’s Foundry TSMC. They use the 7nm FinFET process with DUV lithography, the most advanced way to mass produce graphics chips.

In the course of 2020, the first graphic chips with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) exposure will follow, which will have a further increased packing density and performance per square millimeter.

With the Radeon RX 5500 XT, AMD broke with the scheme “XT marking = fully active chip” for the first time in modern times. The Radeon RX 5600 XT not only continues this ambiguous designation, but deviates even further from tradition: Both the core and the memory subsystem are trimmed.

The hardware basis is the Radeon RX 5700, which is based on AMD’s largest RDNA chip to date, Navi 10. 36 of its 40 physically existing compute units remain on both the Radeon RX 5700 and the RX 5600 XT.

To prevent the smaller model from working as fast as the large one, AMD reduces the clock rates: The RX 5600 XT is at least entitled to around 1.4 GHz, while RX-5700 cards generally operate in the 1.7 GHz range. More about clock rates and raw power.

According to AMD, the Radeon RX 5600 XT was designed for the “ultimate 1080p experience”. This includes not only Triple A games like PUBG and Borderlands 3, but also mass e-sports phenomena like Fortnite, Apex Legends, Overwatch and others, which are relatively demanding on the graphics hardware.

AMD stresses that the RX 5600 XT is indeed an addition to the portfolio, with both the RX 5500 XT and RX 5700 remaining on the market – the former for entry-level 1080p gaming, the latter for WQHD gamers.

The benchmarks will show whether the RX 5600 XT serves a real niche or simply sits between the chairs.

Features

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT test

More painful than with the GPU is the cut in the storage subsystem: AMD shuts down 64 of the 256 data paths to the GDDR6 memory, so that the Radeon RX 5600 XT has to make do with 192 bits.

Furthermore, the memory performance is only 12 gigatransfers per second (12 GT/s or “6,000 MHz”) instead of the 14 GT/s (“7,000 MHz”) used in many other models. The result is an overall 35.7 percent lower memory transfer rate compared to the RX 5700, namely 288 instead of 448 GBytes per second.

The ratio of gigaflops to gigabytes on the Radeon RX 5600 XT consequently tends to be a memory limit – this is especially interesting for overclockers.

Let’s now get to the real value drop of this trimming: the memory capacity. A graphics card can’t be equipped with any amount of memory – at least not without side effects. For example, it is common to install one GiByte per memory channel.

Taking the Radeon RX 5700 (XT) with four channels (4 × 64 = 256 bit) as an example, this results in 8 GiByte total capacity, symmetrically equipped with 8 × 1 GiByte GDDR6 memory.

The total amount is thus derived from the interface width, whereby the latter can easily be doubled. RX-5700 graphics cards with 16 GiByte are technically possible without problems, but would be relatively expensive.

The RX 5500 XT is already produced with twice as much memory as the 8 GiByte variant. However, the Radeon RX 5600 (XT) is only available with 6 GiByte. This doesn’t only look in need of explanation, but also affects the performance in PUBG.

Whilst symmetry is obvious and sensible in terms of memory allocation, it’s not the only option. Graphics memory can also be installed asymmetrically, i.e. with different speeds per module.

The seven year old Geforce GTX 660 (Ti) demonstrates how to populate a memory subsystem designed for 1.5 GiByte with 2 GiByte.

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT gaming
AMD Radeon RX 5500 Spider Chart_board.jpg

In doing so, the memory modules are not attached to the controllers equally, but divided into different groups (clamshell mode). 1.5 GiByte run at full speed – but as soon as a higher capacity is addressed, one GiByte shares the existing data paths, so that the transfer rate is halved.

Even this is much faster than swapping to the system main memory (especially with modern GDDR6 RAM), but a clear emergency solution. Therefore it is not surprising that this idea is hardly used.

Side note: The Geforce GTX 970 is not the same case as the GTX 660 (Ti). Nvidia has decided for the first and so far only time in the GTX 970 to disable a cache block belonging to the rearmost memory controller.

In return, the controllers are all active, but can’t all work at full speed in parallel – more details in the contemporary article.

Performance

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT pc build

Since Navi/RDNA is at the push of a button, AMD wants to establish a different view on the clock rates, which is similar to Nvidia’s in its basic features: The basic clock is not relevant, since it is never reached in practice.

The base clock is the frequency that is maintained even under the most adverse conditions (high temperature and load). Relevant, however, is the “Game Clock”, published for the first time with Navi, and described by Nvidia as “Typical Boost”: the average, which is reached over a wide range of games, resolutions and copies of the specific graphic card model.

Techtestreport can confirm on the basis of the available RX-5000 samples that AMD’s Game Clock represents a valid benchmark for the expected clock rates during gaming.

In fact, it usually falls higher than stated. In addition, there is also the maximum GPU boost clock, which is a good bit higher, but is never maintained at full load.

It’s interesting what happened behind the scenes shortly before the RX-5600-XT launch. While the first batch of RX-5600-XT graphics cards for PUBG had already made the journey to the dealers and the press was also covered with samples, a price reduction of the Geforce RTX 2060 became public.

The Nvidia model now changes hands from around $350 and thus operates not far from the Radeon RX 5600 XT. At the latest here, a differentiation between reference design/ minimum performance and the custom designs of the board partners must be made.

Power Consumption

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT test

The Radeon RX 5600 XT is a mid-range graphics card for PUBG with a typical power consumption of 150 watts (Total Board Power). Standard models work with this value without factory overclocking.

The GPU’s energy budget is specified at a maximum of 135 watts, the remaining 15 watts are due to the graphics memory, voltage conversion, ventilation and other small parts on the board.

Since AMD has not published a reference design for the Radeon RX 5600 XT, all our measurements are based on partner designs.

While the loudness is the subject of the PCGH market overviews and varies greatly from manufacturer to manufacturer and model to model, we at least check the actual power consumption achieved by the RX-5600-XT test cards.

Only in this way can statements about energy efficiency be made. The results are impressive: The XT models operate very economically in idle.

As was the case with the RX 5500 XT before, the RX-5600-XT designs present do not fully utilize their power limit in most cases, which results in high efficiency under gaming load.

One point of criticism remains: AMD still hasn’t implemented a universally functioning low-power mode for multi-monitoring. Already the RX 5700 (XT) and RX 5500 (XT) work with full memory clock as soon as several different monitors make contact – as does the RX 5600 XT.

In our case, a 2160p60 LCD connected via a display port and a 1080p60 screen via HDMI lead to full memory clock and thus unnecessarily high power consumption.

In this case, however, the RX 5600 XT helps AMD’s decision to run only 12 GT/s memory clock to achieve significantly more economical results than its bigger siblings.

Gaming Performance in PUBG

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT gaming

Enough theory, let’s finally get to the beloved beams. How does the Radeon RX 5600 XT with its modern RDNA architecture perform in gaming practice?

We’ll check that out with the PCGH graphics card course 2020. As the Radeon RX 5600 XT is officially a Full-HD graphics card for PUBG (1,920 × 1,080 pixels), we’ll put special focus on this amount of pixels in the benchmarks. In addition, we offer results under WQHD (2,560 × 1,440 pixels).

Of course, comparison cards should not be missing, so that we supplement the test field with the predecessor graphics cards for PUBG as well as various models from Nvidia and older years.

At the end, the PCGH performance index is waiting for you, which, as usual, shows reference cards among each other. There is only one thing to consider: We depict the overall performance, but not the individual indices of the four resolutions.

As expected, the Radeon RX 5600 XT ranks much closer to the Radeon RX 5700 than to the RX 5500 XT – something else would be surprising in view of the hardware base.

On average, the Radeon RX 5600 XT works around 20 percent slower than the RX 5700 and can thus, depending on the game, take on the Geforce GTX 1660 Super, GTX 1660 Ti or RTX 2060.

Overall, Techtestreport comes to the following conclusion: If you don’t want to do without texture details in the present, and want to have untroubled gaming fun in the near future, it’s better to use any 6-GiByte graphics card.

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT design

Our recommendation is to invest the manageable surcharge in a Radeon RX 5700 or Geforce RTX 2060 Super.

If you combine all performance data and let every Fps value flow into the calculation in equal parts, you get the PCGH performance index.

In the case of the Radeon RX 5600 XT, the following ranking results. Overall, the new AMD graphics card for PUBG achieves almost exactly the performance of the Radeon RX Vega 56 or Geforce GTX 1660 Ti:

AMD would like to address users of the widespread Geforce GTX 1060 among others with the Radeon RX 5600 XT. The benchmarks show that there really is a big performance leap waiting here, just as naturally with other models in this haze.

For example, if you use a GTX 970/980, R9 290(X), or RX 470/570, you get a noticeable upgrade by purchasing a Radeon RX 5600 XT.

Verdict

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT chip

AMD’s Radeon RX 5600 XT, the first graphics card of 2020, leaves mixed feelings. On the surface, everything still seems to be right: The model works on average 17 percent slower than the Radeon RX 5700, is cheaper and uses less energy.

The efficiency of the graphics card for PUBG, which officially works with 150, but mostly less watts, is even quite high.

However, if you take a closer look, AMD has to be accused of a certain lack of concept, which doesn’t put the new model in the best light, especially in comparison with the proven RX 5700.

Or the last-minute change in the specification for custom designs, which from now on will be allowed to work considerably more energy-hungry and faster – provided the manufacturer has the appropriate firmware and an adequate cooling design in place.

This change leads to uncontrolled growth in the market, because at least at the beginning it is unclear which models will be equipped with which firmwares, whether there will be further changes over time and how long the transition period will last.

Only the minimum performance of the Radeon RX 5600 XT is clear: If you buy a cheap model below the 300 Dollars mark, you can assume a GPU energy budget of 135 watts, which results in the performance between RTX 2060 and GTX 1660 Super outlined here.

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT power color

The spread beyond that should be larger with the Radeon RX 5600 XT than with any other currently available graphics card. It is even possible that highly bred variants can even take on basic versions of the Radeon RX 5700.

While this paves the way for a colorful market with a great variety of species, a higher basic performance from the start would have been more transparent for customers.

Another point of discussion is storage capacity. For many years AMD has been the spendthrift and equips its graphics cards for PUBG with more than just sufficient capacities.

This fact, in addition to the good driver work, contributes a great deal to the fact that Radeon graphics cards for PUBG are generally considered to be durable.

8 GiByte have long been standard at AMD – and if not, the user can choose between 4 or 8 GiByte.

With the Radeon RX 5600 XT, AMD has thrown this once-rooted advantage overboard without a second thought and finds itself in the same cold water as Nvidia.

Their Geforce midrange has been equipped with 6 GiByte since 2016 and has to make do with this capacity up to and including the RTX 2060 (non-super).

It is generally known that increased texture and shadow quality has a strong effect on whether we find a game, like PUBG pretty or not.

Less well known is that these details are virtually free, as long as the graphics card has sufficient capacity, which the Radeon 5600 XT has, that’s why it’s ranking third on the best Graphics cards for PUBG.


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