5 Best Claw Grip Mouse – Gaming Edition (2020)

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Winner
Razer Basilisk V2 - Wired USB Gaming Mouse with Optical Mouse Switches, Focus+ 20K Optical Sensor, 11 Programmable Buttons and Speedflex Cable
Best Price
Logitech G703 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming Mouse W/Hero 16K Sensor, PowerPlay Compatible, Lightsync RGB, Lightweight 95G+10G Optional, 100-16, 000 DPI, Rubber Side Grips - Black
Razer DeathAdder v2 Gaming Mouse: 20K DPI Optical Sensor - Fastest Gaming Mouse Switch - Chroma RGB Lighting - 8 Programmable Buttons - Rubberized Side Grips - Classic Black
Razer Naga Trinity Gaming Mouse: 16,000 DPI Optical Sensor - Chroma RGB Lighting - Interchangeable Side Plate w/ 2, 7, 12 Button Configurations - Mechanical Switches
Logitech G502 HERO High Performance Gaming Mouse
Model
Razer Basilisk V2
Logitech G703 Lightspeed
Razer DeathAdder v2
Razer Naga Trinity
Logitech G502 HERO
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 9.1/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
Logitech
Razer
Razer
Logitech
Wireless?
Cable length
82 inches
Wireless
82 inches
78 inches
82 inches
Keys & buttons
8 + 4-way mouse wheel
6 + mousewheel
7 + mouse wheel
16 + mousewheel
10 + mousewheel
Resolution
20,000 dpi
16,000 dpi
20,000 dpi
16,000 dpi
16,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Excellent sensor
  • Optomechanical primary keys
  • Numerous additional buttons and adjustable mouse wheel
  • Flexible cable and PTFE sliding feet
  • Ergonomical form
  • Precise sensor
  • Compatible with the Powerplay mousepad
  • Extremely precise sensors
  • Great software
  • Drag-free cable
  • Ergonomic design
  • Wide functional range
  • Exchangeable side panel for thumb keys
  • High precision
  • Stable primary keys
  • Pleasant ergonomics for Claw-Grip & Palm-Grip players
  • 11 programmable keys
  • Powerful sensor
  • Adjustable weight and balance
Cons
  • Functionality without software slightly limited
  • Not enough lighting effects
  • Small selection of additional weights
  • Only two RGB lighting zones
  • Only suited for people with larger hands
  • Only suitable for right-handed users
  • Only little noticeable added value compared to the previous models
  • Mousewheel in raster mode very loud
Winner
Razer Basilisk V2 - Wired USB Gaming Mouse with Optical Mouse Switches, Focus+ 20K Optical Sensor, 11 Programmable Buttons and Speedflex Cable
Model
Razer Basilisk V2
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
Wireless?
Cable length
82 inches
Keys & buttons
8 + 4-way mouse wheel
Resolution
20,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Excellent sensor
  • Optomechanical primary keys
  • Numerous additional buttons and adjustable mouse wheel
  • Flexible cable and PTFE sliding feet
Cons
  • Functionality without software slightly limited
Best Price
Logitech G703 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming Mouse W/Hero 16K Sensor, PowerPlay Compatible, Lightsync RGB, Lightweight 95G+10G Optional, 100-16, 000 DPI, Rubber Side Grips - Black
Model
Logitech G703 Lightspeed
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Logitech
Wireless?
Cable length
Wireless
Keys & buttons
6 + mousewheel
Resolution
16,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Ergonomical form
  • Precise sensor
  • Compatible with the Powerplay mousepad
Cons
  • Not enough lighting effects
  • Small selection of additional weights
Razer DeathAdder v2 Gaming Mouse: 20K DPI Optical Sensor - Fastest Gaming Mouse Switch - Chroma RGB Lighting - 8 Programmable Buttons - Rubberized Side Grips - Classic Black
Model
Razer DeathAdder v2
Test Result
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
Wireless?
Cable length
82 inches
Keys & buttons
7 + mouse wheel
Resolution
20,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Extremely precise sensors
  • Great software
  • Drag-free cable
  • Ergonomic design
Cons
  • Only two RGB lighting zones
  • Only suited for people with larger hands
Razer Naga Trinity Gaming Mouse: 16,000 DPI Optical Sensor - Chroma RGB Lighting - Interchangeable Side Plate w/ 2, 7, 12 Button Configurations - Mechanical Switches
Model
Razer Naga Trinity
Test Result
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
Wireless?
Cable length
78 inches
Keys & buttons
16 + mousewheel
Resolution
16,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Wide functional range
  • Exchangeable side panel for thumb keys
  • High precision
  • Stable primary keys
Cons
  • Only suitable for right-handed users
Logitech G502 HERO High Performance Gaming Mouse
Model
Logitech G502 HERO
Test Result
Test Result 9.1/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Logitech
Wireless?
Cable length
82 inches
Keys & buttons
10 + mousewheel
Resolution
16,000 dpi
Internal memory
Macro function
Ergonomics
Pros
  • Pleasant ergonomics for Claw-Grip & Palm-Grip players
  • 11 programmable keys
  • Powerful sensor
  • Adjustable weight and balance
Cons
  • Only little noticeable added value compared to the previous models
  • Mousewheel in raster mode very loud

The best mouse for gaming with a claw grip

In our Gaming Mouse Test 2020 we clarify which features are indispensable and which scanning performance a gaming mouse must offer – so you are well advised when buying your new mouse. In our guide you will find top lists with our own test results as well as detailed explanations and many tips on the subject of gaming mice.

Ranking First: Razer Basilisk V2

Razer Basilisk V2
The Razer Basilisk V2 gaming mouse – well suited for a claw grip

Pros

  • Excellent sensor
  • Optomechanical primary keys
  • Numerous additional buttons and adjustable mouse wheel
  • Flexible cable and PTFE sliding feet

Cons

  • Functionality without software slightly limited

In detail

In summary, the new Basilisk offers the best that Razer has to offer – only minus the apparently 100 Dollar expensive wireless technology, which differentiates it from the Basilisk Ultimate. This immense price difference is also necessary, however, because the direct competition in the form of the Logitech G502 Hero can be purchased in online shops for just under 50 Dollar and also has an excellent sensor, many additional keys and an ad hoc free mouse wheel with a possible flywheel. The wheel of the Razer mouse, on the other hand, can be adjusted in resistance, but not suddenly switched – both systems offer their own advantages, which are to be evaluated according to the user’s individual requirements.

A slightly better G502 at a currently higher price

It should have become clear by now that both G502 Hero and Basilisk V2 are a good choice if you are looking for a functional all-rounder for various game genres or productive work, which is why the focus is inevitably on the costs.

The Razer Basilisk V2 gaming mouse – Video Review

The Basilisk V2 tries to justify its higher price primarily by the switches, which promise a longer service life, and the superior gliding properties due to the lower weight, better cable and better gliding feet. In addition, in comparison to the G502 Hero, the possible double occupancy of the mouse wheel, the better haptics and the lower susceptibility to dirt – the Basilisk’s case offers fewer slots and edges – are further plus points. In return, Logitech’s counterpart offers two easily accessible buttons on the left side of the left mouse button, an illumination that can be controlled without active software, including a cpi indicator and a weight system.

Objectively and away from the cost, the Basilisk V2 thus offers a decent added value that can knock the G502 off its all-round mouse throne, but in the end the Logitech mouse retains the upper hand when it comes to value for money. There is therefore no clear winner: Those who can and want to pay around 80 percent more from the G502 Hero will find a better alternative in the Basilisk V2. Otherwise, the Hero is also a versatile mouse. For a claw grip gaming style the Basilisk V2 is slightly ahead in our opinion.

Verdict

Finally, there remains the comparison to the other basilisks. This is easiest to compare with the wireless Basilisk Ultimate: This exceptionally expensive mouse is the wireless version of the Basilisk V2, which is excessively equipped with RGB LEDs. The Basilisk X HyperSpeed, which is also wireless, costs around 80 Dollar, even less than the V2, but falls behind in terms of primary buttons, the mouse wheel, gliding characteristics, internal memory and lighting. The same applies to the two wired predecessors of the Basilisk V2, the classic Basilisk and the Basilisk Essential: If you are gaming with a claw grip you can take the Basilisk V2 withouth any issues.

Second: Logitech G703 Lightspeed

Logitech G703 Lightspeed
The Logitech G703 Lightspeed – Wireless claw grip experience

Pros

  • Ergonomical form
  • Precise sensor
  • Compatible with the Powerplay mousepad

Cons

  • Not enough lighting effects
  • Small selection of additional weights

In detail

The comparatively light Logitech G703 has a lot to offer: In addition to six programmable buttons, the lighting on the top side can also be programmed according to your wishes. That’s what the easy-to-use Logitech gaming software is for. For our taste, there should be more effects here, though. The length of the mouse could also be too short for some people. However, we find the overall shape and also the selected materials very pleasant. We always have a good grip thanks to the rubber parts on the sides. With an additional 0.5 oz. weight we increase the weight to a total of 4.5 oz. A larger range of weights would have been nice here.

Logitech G703 – Solid option for gamers with claw grip

By attaching the optionally available powercore module, you can charge the G703 wirelessly via induction using Logitech’s separately available powerplay mouse pad. A thoroughly successful technology that we would hardly want to miss anymore. But that also has its price. The current price for the gaming mouse is around 90 Dollar. But if you don’t want to do without the quite innovative combination with the powerplay pad, you’ll have to add another 120 Dollar. The price for the mouse is ok in our opinion. Price-performance ratio could be better, but it is not massively overpriced for what you get.

Verdict

With its ergonomic and sleek design, the Logitech G703 looks great on your gaming desk. The gaming mouse also has configurable RGB lighting on the top and a weight of 4 oz. The Pixart PMW 3366 sensor also promises precise and reliable gaming – which is confirmed in our test. For gamers with a claw grip the G703 is an excellent choice, as it is not too heavy, but also not too light which can also be a problem with some mice.

Third: Razer DeathAdder v2

Razer DeathAdder v2
The Razer DeathAdder v2 – Great weight for claw grip gamer

Pros

  • Extremely precise sensors
  • Great software
  • Drag-free cable
  • Ergonomic design

Cons

  • Only two RGB lighting zones
  • Only suited for people with larger hands

Razer DeathAdder V2 Test: Worthy successor of a legend

Since its presentation, Razer has continued to update the popular DeathAdder model with better sensors and special editions. The most recent version of DeathAdder so far has been the Razer DeathAdder Elite, which not only replaces DeathAdder V2, but is said to surpass it technically in several ways.

True to the motto “never change a running system”, the Razer DeathAdder V2 offers a similarly pleasant feel and extremely light weight as its predecessors. While it has been significantly upgraded, which I will come to later, the feel is virtually the same.

The Razer DeathAdder V2 is an exceptionally pleasant gaming mouse and is therefore surprisingly well suited for everyday use. It is really comfortable to hold and I can’t really emphasize this enough. It is a gaming mouse that is well suited for longer sessions on the one hand, but that I use surprisingly well for my work in everyday life. Unlike many other computer mice, the Razer DeathAdder V2 tries not to be more than it is. Razer doesn’t take any risks with the mouse, doesn’t try to squiggle the design unnecessarily and thus creates a mouse that fits incredibly comfortably on the palm of your hand, both while playing games and in everyday life. Gaming with a claw grip feels really natural on the DeathAdder V2 which is kind of surprising given its round shape.

The Razer DeatAdder V2 – Video Review

Razer DeathAdder V2 Test – Workmanship

Made of polycarbonate, the Razer DeathAdder V2 feels very solid despite its exceptionally light weight. The buttons provide good feedback, are easy and intuitive to touch. Weighing only 3 oz. it’s extremely light, feels agile, and feels like you can move it precisely and quickly to where you want it to go. It’s incredibly comfortable for gaming and compared to previous generations, it’s a worthy upgrade.

As far as workmanship goes, we can’t complain about anything. For a lightweight gaming mouse in this weight class, it’s solid, the buttons sit firmly and react even if you press them lightly. Even the middle mouse button reacts precisely, even if you don’t press it with greater force. Mouse clicks are registered quickly and even if you make even a short, light click in the heat of the moment. In the case of an open firefight, this can occasionally make the decisive lucky headshot with the last bullet from the secondary weapon. Razer gives a reaction time of only 0.2 milliseconds and while we are far from gaming professionals to notice any major differences here, DeathAdder V2 definitely feels very nimble.

Verdict

Often copied, but never equaled. Hardly any gaming mouse has been cloned as often as the Razer DeathAdder. The new Razer DeathAdder V2 for the year 2020 is a worthy update for the legendary mouse. The upgrades in sensor, haptics and technology make DeathAdder V2 one of the best gaming mice you can buy today. And on top it is surprisingly well suited for a gaming mouse claw grip style.

Fourth: Razer Naga Trinity

Razer Naga Trinity
the Razer Naga Trinity Gaming mouse

Pros

  • Wide functional range
  • Exchangeable side panel for thumb keys
  • High precision
  • Stable primary keys

Cons

  • Only suitable for right-handed users

Razer Naga Trinity: The Technology

You have to look closely to get the secrets out of the Razer Naga Trinity. The right-handed mouse looks as if it was cast from one piece, but the left side part can be changed. The version with two buttons is assembled ex works, and the gaming mouse also comes with side parts with seven and twelve buttons. These two parts offer integrated LEDs and are – like the Naga Trinity in general – compatible with the Razer Chroma, the in-house lighting software.

Between the left and right mouse buttons there is a clickable mouse wheel that can be pressed left and right to trigger up to two additional actions. There are two switches in the middle to adjust the sensor sensitivity (dpi). For the ring finger, there is a storage surface where even the little finger can find a lateral hold and doesn’t drag along on the mouse pad. The 16,000 dpi sensor is located on the underside, as well as a button to switch between a maximum of five programmable profiles. Nice: The USB cable is sheathed.

The Razer Naga Trinity – Great for claw grip gamer

Razer Synapse 3: Mouse fine tuning

To get the full potential of the Razer Naga Trinity, users can’t get around the free “Razer Synapse” software and account creation. But it is not absolutely necessary for operation. The Naga Trinity already works with version 3, which according to Razer will leave beta status in the second quarter of 2020 and is compatible with all upcoming Razer products. The now brightly designed software (previously dark) recognized the gaming mouse at first go and displayed a detailed image. From here, keys could be assigned differently, profiles saved and the lighting adjusted in a submenu. Also the dpi levels (ex works 800, 1.800, 4.500, 9.000 and 16.000 dpi) were adjusted after a few clicks. With “Razer Synapse 3”, users can optionally couple their Razer hardware with the Philips Hue system for synchronous lighting and tinker with their favorite lighting in the new “Chroma Studio”. In short, the software is a great way to spend time.

Razer Naga Trinity: Claw grip monster

No matter whether you’re just playing solitaire, playing online shooters like “PUBG”, or going through click orgies in “DotA 2” – the Razer Naga Trinity performs well in all scenarios. And that’s exactly the point: you have to be at home in at least two of the three worlds mentioned, so that the purchase of the Razer Naga Trinity is really worthwhile. To make sure everything runs smoothly, individual customization via the Razer software is a must. The time spent is worthwhile, however, if you can execute actions faster than your fellow players in games thanks to the up to twelve additional keys or start programs. All these adjustments help claw grip gamers to find the perfect setup for gaming. Reduced to technology, the gaming mouse is a worthy representative of its class.

Fifth: Logitech G502 HERO

Logitech G502 HERO
The Logitech G502 HERO gaming mouse

Pros

  • Pleasant ergonomics for Claw-Grip & Palm-Grip players
  • 11 programmable keys
  • Powerful sensor
  • Adjustable weight and balance

Cons

  • Only little noticeable added value compared to the previous models
  • Mouse wheel in raster mode very loud

In detail

When you look at the Logitech G502 Hero, it’s difficult, if not impossible, to detect any differences from its predecessors. At least in terms of design and ergonomics, almost everything has remained the same. Why change a mouse that was well received by gamers? Furthermore, the shape, which is super comfortable in the hand, especially with the Palm Grip, is a delight. Moreover, the mouse has a good grip thanks to its surface and rubberized sides. And it’s also pretty with its somewhat extravagant design and the more than two meter long braided cable.

The G502 is above all something for friends of extra keys, although not at the level of an MMO mouse. Thus, there are three easily accessible side keys. Next to the left mouse button there are two more additional keys. You’ll have to get used to them a bit first, so that you don’t accidentally press them together with the mouse button. The metal mouse wheel turns very pleasantly, is clickable and can also be pressed to the left or right. Thanks to a switch behind the mouse wheel you can use it with or without raster. However, the precise working mouse wheel is very loud and certainly not to everyone’s taste.

The Logitech G502 HERO – Solid mouse for claw grip gamer

New tech

Of course all eleven buttons can be freely assigned with the Logitech gaming software. There you can also create profiles and, thanks to a processor, save up to five of them on the rodent. The RGB lighting introduced with the Proteus Spectrum is back on board and is also controlled via LGS.

The new features compared to the predecessors are not visually visible, but they are certainly relevant. The new switches are supposed to survive up to 50 million instead of 20 million clicks – of course we didn’t try that for reasons of time, otherwise you might be able to read this text in ten years. The switches are pleasantly smooth-running and have nice pressure points, but they are not so smooth-running that they are accidentally triggered.

The new sensor lifts the G502 Hero into Logitech’s current portfolio. The manufacturer relies on the Hero sensor, which was developed together with Pixart and replaces the former PMW3366. The mouse thus has a dpi range of 100 to 16,000 and 400 IPS instead of the previous 200 to 12,000 dpi. The sensor works extremely precisely without smoothing, filtering or acceleration.

Verdict

If you can cope with the ergonomics and weight of the mouse, you will definitely enjoy the robust, very well manufactured, fast and precise mouse. We didn’t find anything to complain about on the Logitech G502 Hero, either when gaming or working, except for the very loud mouse wheel in raster mode. As the noticeable added value in comparison to the predecessors is hardly noticeable, the price of 90 Dollar seems a bit too high. But the market has already regulated this itself, the retail price is now below 70 Dollar. It is not the best option for gamer that prefer a claw grip style, but if you are switching styles this mouse can be a good compromise. If you’re not necessarily looking for a light mouse for action games, you won’t go wrong with the G502 Hero.

Gaming Mouse & Claw Grip – Guide

Ergonomics: the most important purchase criterion

The most important aspect to consider when buying a gaming mouse is ergonomics. The best equipment with extras such as a 20,000 dpi sensor (Razer Basilisk V2/Deathadder V2), a sliding 12-button block (Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite), or an exchangeable top shell (Sharkoon Light² 200) won’t do you any good if the mouse doesn’t fit very well in your preferred grip and thus doesn’t fit ergonomically in your hand. Should this not be the case, the gaming session can become a torture after only a few minutes: You tense up your wrist or forearm and symptoms of fatigue or even slight pain appear. But how can you tell if a mouse has good ergonomics?

First of all, it is very important that you need to use as little force as possible to move around with the gaming mouse. So, regardless of your grip style (like aclaw grip for example), make sure that your wrist, fingers and forearm muscles remain loose when you use the gaming mouse and that you only tense them briefly and not for too long if the direction of movement changes very quickly. In addition, you should be able to intuitively reach and operate all existing buttons with only minimal finger movement, but above all without bending or stretching your fingers too much. This is especially true for the thumb keys, which are often located above or in front of the ideally rubberized recessed grip for the thumb. The thumb must not unintentionally trigger these when moving the gaming mouse over the gaming mousepad. On the other hand, the thumb buttons should be operable without any major contortions.

The weight – can it be a little lighter or heavier?

If the ergonomics of the gaming mouse are optimal for you, you should also consider the weight and ask yourself if you have any preferences in this regard. Tastes can indeed vary greatly on this subject. There are gamers who prefer a light mouse or a flyweight like the Glorious PC Gaming Race Model O- (2 oz.). Others prefer a heavier weight such as the 5 oz. of the Corsair Scimitar RGB Elite, because you need it when you’re using the input device to be able to make even minimal movements.

Gaming mice with weight system

Because the preferences of gamers vary so much in terms of weight, many manufacturers offer gaming mice that include a weight system. Currently available models with a weight system are the Corsair Nightsword RGB, the Logitech G502 Lightspeed, the Sharkoon Drakonia Black, or the Steelseries Rival 600. These gaming mice can be made heavier with various additional weights, often placed in a compartment on the bottom. This benefits players who can only perform precise movements with a gaming mouse that weighs around 4 oz. and whose weight can be further modified.

Gaming mice with lightweight construction

An opposite trend to computer mice with a weight system are gaming mice with lightweight construction. Here, the low weight is achieved either through cut-outs with a honeycomb structure in the housing (Glorious PC Gaming Race Model D/O- and Sharkoon Light² 200) or, as with the Roccat Kone Pure Ultra (2.5 oz.) and Razer Viper Mini (2.8 oz), through innovative material structures during production. Until recently, the Model O from Glorious PC Gaming Race, whose top shell and base are equipped with honeycomb recesses, was the lightest gaming mouse on the market at 2.8 oz. At the beginning of the year, however, the Model O- (Minus) set this record again with 2 oz.

This makes the Model O- a real flyweight, but unlike the Zaunkoenig M1K, it doesn’t push the concept of lightweight gaming mice to the extreme. The latter mouse weighs just 1 oz., which Zaunkoenig achieves by using the smallest possible carbon fiber chassis and dispensing with the equipment that isn’t absolutely necessary for operating a gaming mouse. The mice in the Model-O range, on the other hand, are even equipped with extra buttons, RGB lighting and a memory for profiles and macros.

The trend towards weight loss can also be observed in the wireless gaming mice. The Razer Viper Ultimate, for example, weighs only 3 oz., just 0.2 oz. less than the wired Razer Viper (not counting the weight of the cable). The two models of the Razer Basilisk are similar. The wireless Ultimate version with its battery is only 0.5 oz. heavier than the Basilisk V2 with cable, which weighs 3.5 oz.. Another very light wireless gaming mouse is the Roccat Kain 200 AIMO with 4.1 oz.

Is there also a gaming mouse for left-handed people?

If you are left-handed and looking for a suitable mouse, it is very difficult to find an input device optimized for your type of user. This is especially true if you also want to play on the PC with the left-handed mouse, which further limits your choice. There are a few left-handed mice designed for daily office work, such as the Hama left-handed mouse, the Evoluent VM4L or the ergonomic left-handed mouse from CSL-Computer. However, only one of the major peripheral manufacturers offers left-handed gaming mice at all with the Razer Deathadder Left-Handed Edition and the Razer Naga Left-Handed Edition, which is still in development.

For left-handed people who don’t necessarily want to maneuver the mouse over the gaming mousepad with their “weak” right hand when gaming on the PC or who want to get used to it, all well-known manufacturers like Asus, Corsair, Cooler Master, Logitech, Razer, Roccat and Steelseries have gaming mice in their portfolio that are suitable for both right- and left-handed people. These mice have an axis-symmetrical design (also called Ambidextrous or ambidextrous design), in which the side buttons, thumb rest, left main button and the complete shape of the left half of the housing are transferred to the right half of the housing or mirrored on the axis in the middle of the chassis. Recommended gaming mice, which are suitable for right- and left-handed users thanks to their axis-symmetrical shape, are the Steelseries Sensei Ten, the Asus ROG Pugio I/II, the Corsair M55 RGB Pro, the Cooler Master MM310, the Logitech G Pro Wireless Gaming Mouse, the Razer Viper (Ultimate) and the Roccat Kova AIMO.

Grip styles in detail – how to get the right grip on your gaming mouse

In our tests we often talk about the fact that a gaming mouse has to fit very well in the hand in order to be a pleasure to hold. By this we mean that it has to convey a “good feeling”, i.e. an appealing and pleasing feel. Does the mouse feel comfortable or bulky? Is the body perhaps too wide, too high or even too short or long? Here we show you the three most common types of handles, which can be applied to a large part of all mouse designs with optimal ergonomics. However, it can happen that gaming mice are only optimized for one grip style. In return, each user handles his mouse individually and, of course, does not slavishly adhere to the three grip styles presented by us. So ask yourself before you buy which grip type you are and test your desired model at a specialist dealer if possible.

Mouse grip type
Mouse grip types (Source: www.bestgamingmicegrip.weebly.com/)

Palm-Grip (palm grip):

More than half of all mouse users use the so-called Palm-Grip (“Palm” comes from the English language and means “palm”), which is also very popular with gamers. The palm rests loosely on the back of the mouse, the thumb as well as the ring finger and little finger are pressed lightly against the left or right side of the mouse or, if available, placed on the designated trays. Rubberized side pads or rubberized finger rests, as offered by many gaming mice, provide a non-slip grip even when the fingers are sweaty. This position ensures the greatest possible comfort, as the mouse is often only moved from the wrist, which prevents symptoms of fatigue.

Claw-Grip:

In direct comparison to the Palm-Grip, the Claw-Grip is less common, but is becoming increasingly popular among gamers and e-sports enthusiasts. Characteristic for this grip type is the angled position of the index, middle and ring fingers while the palm of the hand does not touch the back of the mouse. Hence the name, as this hand position resembles an animal claw. This results in fewer contact points between mouse and hand. Experienced players can perform very fast, short and precise movements with this grip method. In return, the gaming mouse has to be equipped with rubberized or at least roughened side parts for an optimal grip. In addition, the forearm is always moved with this grip style.

Fingertip grip (fingertip grip):

With this unusual grip method, which is only practiced by a few gamers and is often used in smaller gaming mouse standard models such as the Razer Viper Mini or Roccat Kone Pure, there is contact between mouse and hand in only a few places. The mouse is practically only guided with the fingertips. You can also imagine the fingertip grip as an extreme and stretched version of the claw grip, as the fingers hardly bend at all, unlike the claw grip style. Whoever can use this demanding grip style in a controlled manner is able to perform even faster manoeuvres. At the same time, it is easy on the forearm, as many mouse movements are made from the wrist.

Whichever grip style you prefer: The most important thing is that the mouse lies comfortably in the hand and that you can reach all buttons – whether the side buttons or the Dpi switch on the top – without effort. This is the only way to play and work without tiring.

The sensor: the power centre of the gaming mouse

The sensor is the heart of every gaming mouse (and of course of every conventional mouse). Basically, there are two types of sensors for office and gaming mice that, despite their misleading names, both scan optically: the optical sensor with infrared LED scanning and the laser sensor. Although both sensor types are optimally suited for gaming, the laser sensor has been increasingly replaced by the version with IR LED scanning over the last four years.

Do more dpi mean higher precision?

Dpi stands for dots per Inch and refers to the number of movement steps per inch or inch. Transferred to a gaming mouse, this means the number of pixels that the mouse pointer moves across the screen in 2D mode when the mouse is moved one inch (25.4 millimetres). So, the higher the Dpi number, the more pixels the mouse pointer moves when you move your mouse 25.4 millimeters in one direction. It is still commonly mistakenly assumed that a very high dpi rate also means that the mouse works more precisely or scans more sensitively. However, it’s not about precision, but about the mouse speed.

Wired or wireless?

If you decide to buy a wireless mouse, keep in mind that the built-in battery or, as with the Logitech G603/G604, the battery needed to run the mouse naturally affects weight. However, there are alternative wireless mice with induction charging, such as the Logitech G903/703 (Logitech Powerplay technology) or the Razer Mamba Hyperflux (Razer Hyperflux technology). These mice only have a capacitor, which only has an imperceptible effect on the total weight. You can always feel the weight of mice with a built-in battery, although Razer has two wireless gaming mice in its program, the Viper and Basilisk Ultra, which weigh just 2.8 oz. and 3.4 oz. respectively despite the battery.

Wired vs wireless gaming mouse – Is there delay?

The advantage of wireless mice over wired mice is obvious: You don’t need a tiresome string to use the gaming mouse – except for charging, of course. At this point we would like to dispel a prejudice. Wireless mice (also called wireless mice) are often accused of not working without delay, i.e. not being latency-free, as it is called in the jargon. In our experience, this criticism is not tenable. We have made a direct comparison between wireless and wired mice (see video above) and could not find any measurable or tangible differences!

However, if you buy a new mouse with a cable, which usually offers the same features as its wireless counterpart, you can save a few bucks. If you look at the price lists for gaming mice, you’ll notice that you have to dig deep into your pocket for wireless freedom. The wireless Razer Basilisk Ultimate, for example, which is equipped with an additional RGB light strip, currently costs 100 dollar, whereas the Razer Basilisk V2, which is tested here, is almost half as cheap with its price of 90 Dollar. Even if there is no gaming mouse available with or without cables, the buyer of a wireless gaming mouse has to put at least 90 Dollar (Logitech G604 Lightspeed) and up to 170 Dollar for top models like the Asus ROG Chakram on the counter.

What makes a good software?

The software is not only of central importance for functions like macro creation and profile management. It should also offer the possibility of simply assigning new functions to each key and setting the storable dpi levels in 50 dpi steps separately for the horizontal and vertical axes. Another indispensable software option in the field of performance is the ability to adjust the polling rate in four steps (1,000/500/250/125 Hz). If the gaming mouse is equipped with RGB lighting, the effects palette should not be too narrow and it should be easy to assign the RGB lighting tricks to the LEDs or to select colors for the user-defined mode.

A recommendable software should be able to do even more. Since the majority of all gaming mice use an ARM CPU to help with sensor scanning, the software should also give the gamer the option to control these scanning optimizations. For example, there should always be the option to switch the path correction (angle snapping) off or on and other settings should be available to optimize the scanning of the optical sensor to different gaming mouse pads easily and with only a few mouse movements (background calibration).

Another indispensable setting option concerns the lift-off distance or also called lift height. The gamer must be able to determine this himself and adapt it to his gaming style. Often it is only possible to minimize the Lift-Off-Distance, which is often maximized in the factory, after the installation of the software. Sometimes you will also find options in the software to reduce the key reaction time. These settings, often called “Debouncing Time” or “Button Response Time” are a nice but rather optional extra.


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