5 Best Gaming Laptops for Overwatch in 2020

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Winner
MSI GE65 Raider-049 15.6" 240Hz Gaming Laptop, Intel Core i9-9880H, NVIDIA RTX 2070, 32GB, 1TB NVMe SSD, Win10, VR Ready
Best Price
MSI GE75 Raider-286 17.3" Gaming Laptop, 144Hz Display, Thin Bezel, Intel Core i7-9750H, NVIDIA GeForce RTX2070, 16GB, 512GB NVMe SSD, 17-30.99"
Razer Blade 15 Gaming Laptop - Intel Core i7-8750H 6 Core, GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q, 15.6" FHD 144Hz, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, Chroma RGB Keyboard, Thunderbolt 3, 0.70" thin, CNC Aluminum (Renewed)
Asus ROG Strix Scar III (2019) Gaming Laptop, 15.6” 240Hz IPS Type FHD, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060, Intel Core i7-9750H, 16GB DDR4, 1TB PCIe Nvme SSD, Per-Key RGB KB, Windows 10, G531GV-DB76
Lenovo Ideapad L340 Gaming Laptop, 15.6 Inch FHD (1920 X 1080) IPS Display, Intel Core i5-9300H Processor, 8GB DDR4 RAM, 512GB Nvme SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650, Windows 10, 81LK00HDUS, Black
Model
GE65
GE75
Blade 15
ROG Strix Scar III
Ideapad L340
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 9.5/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 8.8/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 8.7/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 8.4/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
MSI
MSI
Razer
Asus
Lenovo
RAM
32GB
16GB
16GB RAM
16GB DDR4
8GB
CPU
Intel Core i9-9880H
Intel Core i7-9750H
Intel Core i7-8750H 6 Core
Intel Core i7-9750H
Intel Core i5-9300H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA RTX 2070
NVIDIA GeForce RTX2070
GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650
Storage Capacity
1TB SSD
512GB SSD
512GB SSD
1TB SSD
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.49 lbs
5.75 lbs
4.63 lbs
5.67 lbs
4.84 lbs
Pros
  • Best Gaming Performance
  • Awesome Quality
  • Best Screen Quality in the Game
  • Great Performance
  • SSD with good capacity
  • Best Price for Performance
  • Light weight
  • Good Performance
  • Silent Gaming Machine
  • Good Performance
  • Great Sound
  • Many Ports
  • Good Screen
  • Cheap Price
  • Individualized Versions available
Cons
  • Pricey
  • No Thunderbolt 3 port
  • Screen not fit for strong Sunlight
  • Not the best Battery
  • Not easily upgradable
Winner
MSI GE65 Raider-049 15.6" 240Hz Gaming Laptop, Intel Core i9-9880H, NVIDIA RTX 2070, 32GB, 1TB NVMe SSD, Win10, VR Ready
Model
GE65
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
MSI
RAM
32GB
CPU
Intel Core i9-9880H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA RTX 2070
Storage Capacity
1TB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.49 lbs
Pros
  • Best Gaming Performance
  • Awesome Quality
  • Best Screen Quality in the Game
Cons
  • Pricey
Best Price
MSI GE75 Raider-286 17.3" Gaming Laptop, 144Hz Display, Thin Bezel, Intel Core i7-9750H, NVIDIA GeForce RTX2070, 16GB, 512GB NVMe SSD, 17-30.99"
Model
GE75
Test Result
Test Result 9.5/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
MSI
RAM
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA GeForce RTX2070
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.75 lbs
Pros
  • Great Performance
  • SSD with good capacity
  • Best Price for Performance
Cons
  • No Thunderbolt 3 port
Razer Blade 15 Gaming Laptop - Intel Core i7-8750H 6 Core, GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q, 15.6" FHD 144Hz, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, Chroma RGB Keyboard, Thunderbolt 3, 0.70" thin, CNC Aluminum (Renewed)
Model
Blade 15
Test Result
Test Result 8.8/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
RAM
16GB RAM
CPU
Intel Core i7-8750H 6 Core
Graphics Card
GeForce RTX 2070 Max-Q
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
4.63 lbs
Pros
  • Light weight
  • Good Performance
  • Silent Gaming Machine
Cons
  • Screen not fit for strong Sunlight
Asus ROG Strix Scar III (2019) Gaming Laptop, 15.6” 240Hz IPS Type FHD, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060, Intel Core i7-9750H, 16GB DDR4, 1TB PCIe Nvme SSD, Per-Key RGB KB, Windows 10, G531GV-DB76
Model
ROG Strix Scar III
Test Result
Test Result 8.7/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Asus
RAM
16GB DDR4
CPU
Intel Core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
Storage Capacity
1TB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.67 lbs
Pros
  • Good Performance
  • Great Sound
  • Many Ports
Cons
  • Not the best Battery
Lenovo Ideapad L340 Gaming Laptop, 15.6 Inch FHD (1920 X 1080) IPS Display, Intel Core i5-9300H Processor, 8GB DDR4 RAM, 512GB Nvme SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650, Windows 10, 81LK00HDUS, Black
Model
Ideapad L340
Test Result
Test Result 8.4/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
RAM
8GB
CPU
Intel Core i5-9300H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
4.84 lbs
Pros
  • Good Screen
  • Cheap Price
  • Individualized Versions available
Cons
  • Not easily upgradable

Overwatch was released by Blizzard in 2016. Since then the game has gained massive popularity and renewed itself with new updates. In this Article you will find the best Gaming Laptops for Overwatch we tested, the system requirements for Overwatch and the in-depth report of each Laptop.

System Requirements of Overwatch

  • Processor: If you want to play Overwatch on your PC, you should have at least an Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom X3 865, better still an Intel Core i5 or AMD Phenom II X3 with 2.8 GHz.
  • RAM: 6 GByte is required for a truly fluid gaming experience. However, the game also runs with 4 GByte.
  • Graphics card: Opt for an Nvidia GeForce GTX 460, ATI Radeon HD 4850 or Intel HD Graphics 4400 and play it safe with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 or ATI Radeon HD 7950.
  • Hard disk: The game requires 5 GByte of space on your hard disk.

Recommended System Hardware for Overwatch:

  • Processor: Intel Core i5 or AMD Phenom II X3, 2.8 GHz
  • Ram: 6 GB
  • System: Windows Vista/7/ 8/10 64-bit (latest Service Pack)
  • Graphics card: Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 or ATI Radeon HD 7950
  • Free Storage: 40GB

Ranking First: MSI GE65 (Test Below Rank 2)

MSI GE65 review
MSI GE65

Pros

  • Best Gaming Performance
  • Awesome Quality
  • Best Screen Quality in the Game

Cons

  • Pricey

Ranking Second: MSI GE75

MSI GE75 review
MSI GE75

Pros

  • Great Performance
  • SSD with good Speed
  • Best Price for Performance

Cons

  • No Thunderbolt 3 port

In this double test, we look at two fast gaming notebooks, the MSI GE75 Raider 9SG and the MSI GE65 Raider 9SF, which with their comparatively compact dimensions and narrow screen edges are fully in line with the trend, but which don’t have to make do with the slightly trimmed Max-Q graphics cards in terms of performance, but are instead equipped with the fully-fledged Max-P models. This makes them real all-rounders, as this Hardwareluxx test on the following pages proves.

The notebook market is currently not lacking in particularly slim and rather light gaming devices. However, corresponding devices such as the ASUS ROG Zephyrus M or the Gigabyte Aero 15 usually rely on the Max-Q offshoots of the graphics cards, which are trimmed for efficiency and thus somewhat slower. The GE series from MSI tries to combine both worlds, offers not quite as slim dimensions, but can offer the full Max-P offshoots and also slim screen edges. So they are real all-rounders for all those who want to play on the go and still remain very mobile.

As usual, the GE series from MSI is available in two different basic versions, which initially differ in display size. While the MSI GE75 Raider has a 17.3 inch screen, the GE65 Raider is slightly smaller with 15.6 inch. The resulting smaller space in the top case is at the expense of cooling, which is why the GE65 is available with a maximum of GeForce RTX 2070, while the big sister model can even be fitted with the top model. MSI also lives up to the gaming demands in terms of resolution, as they exclusively rely on the gamer-friendly Full HD resolution with native 1,920 x 1,080 pixels and use fast IPS panels with at least 144 Hz. The smaller GE65 Raider is even available with a particularly fast 240 Hz panel.

In both devices, MSI relies on an Intel CPU of the ninth core generation, usually the Intel Core i7-9750H with six up to 4.5 GHz fast Coffee Lake Refresh cores. For this purpose, there is up to 64 GB RAM, whereby MSI usually uses 16 GB DDR4 memory with 2,666 MHz. Depending on the buyer’s preference, the Taiwanese install a combination of fast NVMe-SSD and standard magnetic storage hard disk as an additional data grave. The top model can even be equipped with two flash memory modules in a RAID 0 array. Modern connections up to USB Type-C and DisplayPort, but also a SteelSeries keyboard with RGB backlighting and sound from DynAudio round off the overall package.

Design

Both models belong to MSI’s GE family and are therefore very similar in appearance. Overall, MSI relies on a black color scheme, which at least on the screen cover is enhanced by two red stripes and the typical dragon emblem. In addition, there are numerous corners and edges, which lend the notebooks a thoroughly sporty appearance. Whilst brushed aluminum is used for the display lid, the top case is made of plastic, which goes in favor of a low weight, as both devices are relatively light with around 2.27 and 5.7 lbs.

Overall, the MSI GE65 Raider 9SF measures 357.7 x 248 x 26.9 mm, while the GE75 Raider 9SG is slightly larger and thicker at 397 x 270 x 27.5 mm. Compared to the XMG Pro 15 and the XMG Pro 17 from our last test, the MSI devices are thus similarly compact, but somewhat lighter and more portable. MSI combines the advantages of both worlds – a full Max-P graphics card and a slim design with thin screen edges.

This does not affect the stability. Both devices are excellently manufactured. Even under stronger pressure, the two barebones don’t give way at any point, and there are no sharp edges. The display hinges are very torsion-resistant and don’t wobble for long. It’s just a pity that the surface is very susceptible to grease and dirt stains – a constant cleaning with the duster is on the agenda.

Ports

In terms of connections, the GE series from MSI offers everything the gamer’s heart desires. The only thing you might miss is a fast and flexible Thunderbolt 3 connector, after all there is a modern type C interface. Also included are USB Type A, HDMI, DisplayPort and gold-plated jacks for connecting a headset. The sound output is otherwise provided by integrated Dynaudio loudspeakers in both models, which can provide a good gaming sound even in loud environments.

Even a card reader has made it into the devices – more and more manufacturers are now eliminating it. The GE series communicates wirelessly via AC-WiFi and Bluetooth 5.0, and a Gigabit Ethernet interface for network integration is also not missing. Thanks to killer technology and DoubleShot Pro, the gaming traffic is always processed with priority, which should improve latency and speed during gaming.

Keyboard and Touchpad

MSI has also brought the expertise of SteelSeries on board for its GE series. The chiclet keys behave as one is used to from an MSI notebook: They are usually 15 x 15 mm in size and are placed at a distance of 4 mm. The stroke is quite small, but the key feedback overall is very good. Frequent writers of numbers also enjoy a separate number pad, although the keys here turn out considerably smaller.

MSI once again doesn’t use a standard layout and, for example, dispenses with the right Windows key or has significantly reduced the size of the return key. At least: The left FN key can be turned into the Windows key by a software tool. It is also practical that when the FN key is pressed, only those keys that have an additional function light up. This makes the search for the right key to control the display brightness or volume much easier. Anti-Ghosting is also on board, as is RGB backlighting, which can be configured individually for each key via the SteelSeries 3 engine and is extremely bright.

The touchpad is generously sized in both models with 110 x 64 mm and has a good precision that doesn’t decrease towards the corners and edges and easily understands all inputs up to multi-touch gestures and quickly implements them. The keys for the left and right mouse click are dedicated, whereby these are a bit too smooth-running. While the GE75 Raider has a red frame all around, this has been left out on the smaller model – a small difference between the two sister models.

Display

Not only the screen diagonal is different in our two test candidates, but also the panels. While the GE65 uses a 240 Hz fast panel, the GE75 is equipped with a slightly slower 144 Hz type. In both cases, we rely on an IPS panel with a stable viewing angle, each with a resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels. MSI relies here on AU Optronics and Sharp as suppliers. Both model variants are very well illuminated and achieve a homogeneity of over 92%, but could be more luminous for outdoor use or very bright environments. Both series achieve here only just under 300 cd/m².

Like many current gaming notebooks, they also have to struggle with a slight blue cast. While the optimal color temperature is around 6,500 K, the MSI bolides reach cooler temperatures on average with around 7,000 and 7,400 K. Other gaming notebooks, however, sometimes reach values of well over 7,700 K, such as the XMG Pro series that we recently tested.

Battery

Both models are powered by a 280 W external power supply, which makes the batteries fit within one and a half hours. The 15.6-inch model then allows itself 15.6 W in office mode, while the GE75 Raider swallows around 20 W due to its larger screen. In gaming mode, just under 230 and 260 W stand in opposition, whereby the faster GeForce RTX 2080 and once again the larger screen naturally pay their tribute here. At the peak, both devices can swallow up to 252.1 and 271.9 Watts.

Thus both devices are within their power supply specifications. Depending on the screen size, MSI has installed a 51 or 65 Wh battery for on the road. It is sufficient for 275 to 305 minutes runtime and thus for about 4.5 to 5.0 hours. Under load, however, the screen turns black after 74 or 59 minutes, whereas the GE75 Raider comes off a bit worse. MSI can’t keep up with the Gigabyte Aero 15’s large battery.

Heating

There are no serious problems with cooling, but especially the MSI GE75 Raider gets very hot under extreme load and starts to throttle the clock rate of its CPU. In the absolute worst case scenario, which we simulate as usual with Prime95 and Furmark, the Intel Core i7-9750H’s basic clock rate drops briefly to as low as 1.9 GHz. However, this only happens after about 20 minutes of continuous load and only within a fraction of a second.

The GE65 Raider, on the other hand, gets warmer on the surface due to the tighter space conditions, but has no problems with throttling. The two RTX graphics cards can always call up their full performance in the notebooks on the other hand and get to work with speeds of 1,560 to 1,740 MHz. Depending on the model, between 79 and 80 °C are reached, which is good for Max-P. The Intel CPU reaches 85 to 95 °C for the GE75. Other gaming devices stay cooler here.

The partly very high temperatures inside are hardly noticeable on the surface. The MSI GE65 Raider 9SF reaches up to 43 °C at its peak, while the larger sister model does not quite reach 38 °C. These values are achieved in the second and fifth quadrant and thus exactly there, where the cooling of the processor and graphics card come together. As usual, the devices get warmer on the bottom side than on the top case and thus in the area of the keyboard and touchpad. On average we measured about 28 to 31 °C. Both devices stay a good bit cooler in normal office use.

The current GE series proves to be very quiet in this respect. At times, the cooling temporarily switches off completely in idle under low load, which means that the notebooks work passively and thus completely silently. However, the cooling in this discipline usually produces a noise level of 35.1 or 36.6 dB(A). When gaming and thus putting processor and graphic card under load, the noise level increases to 49.8 to 51.5 dB(A), whereby the 17 inch version operates more quietly. It’s up to 53.8 dB(A) under absolute full load. For gaming notebooks of this price and performance category, this is quite acceptable.

Conclusion

The MSI GE75 Raider 9SG and the MSI GE65 Raider 9SF compete with comparatively compact and lightweight dimensions but with full graphics power against strong competition. While many compact devices in the gaming sector rely on the Max-Q graphics cards from NVIDIA, the GE series can offer the full Max-P models and thus ultimately provide the higher gaming performance. So MSI takes advantage of both worlds, being slightly thicker and heavier, but faster. The XMG-Pro series from Schenker Technologies is similarly equipped, but not quite as compact and light as the MSI series. Here, the Taiwanese are slightly ahead.

The rest of the equipment is also impressive: This includes the good SteelSeries keyboard with RGB backlighting, Dynaudio sound and killer network chips, and of course fast IPS panels with narrow screen edges. MSI even offers the smaller 15.6-inch model with an especially fast 240 Hz panel, although such a frame rate can only be achieved by reducing details or with older games – even if you can go as far as an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070.

The GeForce RTX 2080 is reserved for its big sister model, which has a 144Hz panel, but without G-Sync support. Both displays are very well lit, but a bit dark and slightly bluish. The workmanship of the case is excellent, the design is contemporary and yet colorful in places. It’s a pity that the surface is very susceptible to grease and dirt stains.

The MSI GE75 Raider throttles for a short time under extreme load, the smaller GE65 has no problems at least in our configuration, which corresponds to the maximum configuration. The volume is okay, the runtimes under load are a bit short.

Ranking Third: Razer Blade 15

Razer Blade 15 review

Pros

  • Light weight
  • Silent Gaming Machine
  • Good Performance

Cons

  • Screen not fit for strong Sunlight

At first glance, the new and the one-year-old Razer Blade 15 look similar: both rely on an identical first-class chassis. But the biggest advantage of the new model is not obvious arguments – it’s what’s inside.

240 Hz panel! Geforce RTX 2070 Max-Q! Intel Core i7-9750H! The Razer Blade 15 Advanced is the new version of the 15.6-inch notebook with in many areas better components. The question is: Is it worth upgrading to the 2019 hardware? After all, the system in the configuration tested by Techtestreport is after all about $1700 expensive. Included are the 240 Hz panel with Full HD resolution mentioned at the beginning, 16 GByte DDR4 RAM and a 512 GByte NVMe SSD.

The new naming of the Blade 15 takes some getting used to: There is the base model and the advanced model in 2019. Both notebooks have the same case, but can be ordered with different panels and graphics units. Thus, Razer uses slower hardware in the base model – for example, a Geforce RTX 2060 Max-Q and a ninth generation Core i7 processor. Faster components and a larger battery are only available in the advanced version, which we are testing.

At the same time, the editors were presented with Razer’s predecessor model – with Nvidia’s Geforce GTX 1070 Max-Q, Core i7-8750H, 16 GB RAM, 512 GByte SSD and an also 15.6 inch Full HD panel, which however only achieves a frame rate of 144 Hz. The differences between the two models are obvious on paper, but the question remains whether this also has an impact on the gaming suitability.

Design

Externally, both notebooks are completely identical except for the different color scheme. No wonder, as the silver Blade 15 Advanced and the black Blade 15 2018 are based on the identical chassis, which measures 17.8 x 235 x 355 mm. And that is very well manufactured. The aluminium seems to be robust and stable and can also withstand rough transport with the bike in the backpack without scratches. The display hinges hold the screen firmly in place, and nothing bends under heavy pressure or when furiously typing in team chat.

Visually, both colours know how to please in their own way. We personally find the all-black Razer design with green USB sockets of the older model a little better. The narrow display edges and the angular case design of both laptops are reminiscent of Apple’s Macbook series and modern ultrabooks in general, just like the oversized touchpad, which is unusual for a gaming notebook. This also applies to the untypical flat keyboard, which is identical on both devices.

Although the keycaps of the keyboards are individually adjustable in many colors, the flat keys are more suitable for frequent typing than for gaming. But maybe we are also simply used to mechanical keyboards when playing Mordhau, Counter Strike: Global Offensive or The Division 2. The touchpad is an excellent input device due to its oversized sensor surface and surpasses some other notebooks that are geared towards office work by far. If we don’t play on the Blade 15, we don’t miss a dedicated mouse. On the other hand, there is no dedicated key on the keyboard for turning off the touchpad. This has to be solved accordingly via Windows 10.

Ports

The 15.6-inch devices are also not lacking in connections. Keyboard, mouse and USB headset find room at USB-A ports according to USB 3.2 Gen2. But watch out: The 2018 model and the base version of the device rely on the somewhat slower USB 3.2 Gen1. However, all versions have a Thunderbolt 3 socket with USB type C socket. We can connect adapters for wired Ethernet to it, for example. Unfortunately, this connection is missing on the Blade 15 – something to be criticized in a gaming notebook. We can connect monitors to an HDMI 2.0b port or to mini display port 1.4.

Performance

Both the Blade 15 2018 and the Blade 15 Advanced have a Core i7 processor with six cores and twelve threads per hyper-threading. Both models have a power budget of 45 watts. The difference: The older Core i7-8750H nominally clocks with 2.2 GHz per core and can temporarily reach a turbo of 4.1 GHz. The Core i7-9750H is a bit faster with 2.6 GHz per core and 4.5 GHz turbo. We notice the difference after barely six runs of Cinebench R20, in which the newer model passes the test about 7 percent faster – with 2,073 to 1,939 points. Both notebooks use a power consumption of around 45 watts during the test, after accessing up to 80 watts for a few seconds.

The graphics cards of both models differ more from each other: The Geforce RTX 2070 Max-Q belongs to the Turing generation and is based on the TU106 chip. It is designed for 90 watts and can access 2,304 shader units and 8 GByte GDDR6 video memory at a GPU clock rate of about 1,785 MHz. The Geforce GTX 1070 Max-Q is based on the GP104B chip of the previous Pascal architecture with 2,048 shader units of 8 GByte GDDR5 video memory; the GPU clock is typically 1,215 MHz. The power budget of 115 watts is considerably higher than that of its Turing counterpart.

In the test we compare both notebooks in Overwatch. These titles put a heavy load on graphics units and are typically limited by GPUs and not CPUs. In Lara Croft’s adventure we clearly see the generation difference: We measured an average of 82 frames per second in the demanding integrated benchmark of Overwatch. The 2018 model of the Razer Blade 15 reaches 66 fps – and is almost 20 percent slower. In Battlefield V both models don’t manage to reach the desired 60 fps. We measured 56 fps on the Razer Blade 15 Advanced and 52 fps on the predecessor.

In order to test the 15.6 inch panels of both notebooks, we play one round each in competitive titles. We check the frame rates in the tactical shooter CSGO in native Full HD resolution and at very high and very low details. With very high settings, both notebooks are almost on par, the Razer Blade Advanced is slightly in front with 179 to 159 fps. At very low details we measure 222 fps to 198 fps, the new version of the Blade 15 is about 10 percent faster here.

We have a similar result in the medieval game Mordhau: We run across the battlefield with 114 and 108 frames per second respectively. The difference measured by these figures alone does not justify an upgrade to the 2019 model.

Screen

In theory, the 240 Hz panel of the Blade 15 Advanced sounds like a huge advantage over its 144 Hz counterpart. However, we hardly notice it in practice: In native resolution, both notebooks don’t even make it to 240 fps in CSGO at low details in order to fully utilize the panel’s potential. Subjectively, we also don’t see any difference between 144 and 240 Hz. In CSGO and in Mordhau we always hit our opponents equally well or less well depending on the perspective.

Instead of paying the extra cost for a 240 Hz panel, we’d rather invest the money in a large 27-inch or 32-inch monitor. After all, looking for enemy characters on the small 15.6-inch panels is a much greater handicap than a low frame rate. However: Currently, the faster display in the Razer online shop is cheaper than the 144 Hz variant.

Both the 2018 model and the new Blade 15 Advanced score rather mediocre with their displays. The older version at least manages to reach a maximum of 324 cd/m², the current model shines with a maximum of 270 cd/m². In low light conditions, such as when the sun shines directly through the window onto the display, the anti-reflective coating of both notebooks also fails partially. We constantly have to adjust the display angle in order not to see annoying light spots – that works better!

Heating and Noise

Interesting: The Blade 15 Advanced turns up considerably less loud under load. Razer has apparently worked on the fan system. This difference is also noticeable when we get into a demanding game like The Division 2. Both notebooks are – typical for gaming devices – relatively loud. However, the Blade 15 2018 is much noisier and the waste heat of the older model is also noticeably higher. It gets unpleasantly hot between the I and L keys under constant load.

We haven’t been able to detect this problem in the new Blade Advanced. The 2018 version already starts to blow under lighter load – for instance when we unpack a zip archive. In contrast, we hear a constant, quiet rattling of the fan in idle mode of the Blade 15 Advanced, which is only perceptible from a short distance. The 2019 model is much quieter under load, so you don’t necessarily have to put on headphones.

That the ventilation has noticeably improved is also noticeable in the CPU’s readout temperatures. The older model turns up directly under load – and still the CPU reaches almost 100 degrees Celsius for a short time. The Blade 15 Advanced doesn’t have this problem: We measured a maximum of 75 degrees Celsius here. The more efficient modern hardware – more precisely the graphics unit – also produces less waste heat, which has to be compensated.

Battery and SSD

A look inside both notebooks shows that the new model uses a slightly larger copper plate on important components. The two fans, however, are the same size. The notebooks are also very similar internally: the two SO-DIMM modules are interchangeable, as are the Samsung SSD and the Intel WLAN module.

Both notebooks use an 80 watt hour battery. This makes both devices suitable for mobile working even without a power supply. The battery benchmark of the PCMark10 simulates light typing, web browsing, idle and video conferencing. The laptops last for 5:30 hours, which is a good value for gaming devices. Of course, they don’t replace a pure ultrabook, especially since the 2018 model weighs 2,071 grams and the 1019 model even 2,150 grams – leaving the heavy power supply units out.

Razer uses a PM981 SSD from Samsung with a capacity of 512 GBytes in both Blade-15 versions. As expected, it is satisfactorily fast: We measured 2,327 MByte/s reading and 2,076 MByte/s sequential writing on the Blade 15 2018 with the Crystaldiskmark tool. The new model is a bit faster: 3,100 MByte/s reading and 1,911 MByte/s writing are possible.

We’ve been waiting a long time for Razer to remove the account constraint on its Razer Synapse software – meanwhile, registration is no longer necessary. That’s good, because we can make some settings on both models that improve performance a bit.

Especially the older version shows improvements, but at the expense of volume. We can manually turn the fan control up to full power in the software. This makes the system very loud, but also less warm and slightly more powerful. The CPU achieves about 2,400 points in Cinebench R20 instead of the previous 1,939, and the frame rates in The Division 2 and Rise of the Tomb Raider increase by about 5 percent. The question is whether users want to accept a constant annoying fan noise for these small gains.

The new version of the Razer Blade 15 has a little more adjustment options: We can select a slower or faster CPU and parallel a GPU profile. Here, Cinebench R20ß also shows about 2,400 points, as the CPU receives a power of about 80 watts longer. However, the GPU regulator does not bring any measurable advantages in our test.

Conclusion

The Razer Blade 15’s Adavanced model must do justice to a strong predecessor. This works very well, as it inherits the excellent 15.6-inch aluminum chassis, which also has enough USB-A ports, Thunderbolt 3 and display connections for two monitors. However, the new model also inherits the predecessor’s missing RJ-45 socket. Keyboard and touchpad have also remained the same and are still very good.

Razer replaces the 144 Hz display with a 240 Hz variant, the resolution remains the same with 1080p. The current variant is inferior in terms of brightness: We measured 275 cd/m² in comparison to the 324 cd/m² of the 2018 version. Direct light can become an obstacle there.

The advanced version of the Razer Blade 15 has the advantage of being able to fall back on updated hardware from Intel and Nvidia. The Geforce RTX 2070 Max-Q and the Core i7-9750H are usually not much faster in practice – we measured a rough 10 percent difference. Only in graphically very demanding titles like Rise of the Tomb Raider do we register a performance improvement of about 20 percent.

What makes the new generation superior for us: The cooling is much quieter under load. Nevertheless, the current model manages to cool the CPU and GPU better. This is also reflected in the waste heat radiating through the case. While it gets unpleasantly hot in some places on the 2018 model, this problem is no longer present in the current version.

For this reason alone, we would opt for the advanced version of the Razer Blade 15, even if it is a bit more expensive in parts. However, an upgrade from the predecessor is not necessary.

Ranking Fourth: Asus ROG Strix Scar III

Asus ROG Strix Scar III review

Pros

  • Good Performance
  • Great Sound
  • Many Ports

Cons

  • Not the best Battery

Asus delights the gaming fans in quick succession with always new notebooks. The ROG Strix Scar III is the manufacturer’s latest offshoot, which has the fast display with 3 ms response time and 240 Hz refresh rate on board as a highlight. And indeed, the matt panelin combination with the built-in RTX2070 from Nvidia shows its class.

Display

The image is sharp and quite bright, with the upper area being darker than the lower area. Mirroring doesn’t do anything, of course, and the display can also be seen well at an oblique viewing angle. The keyboard is individually illuminated and of consistently above average quality.

Keyboard

As there wasn’t any space left for a number pad on the right next to the keyboard, Asus has integrated it into the touchpad. It can be activated with the push of a button and allows the quick entry of long number sequences. The keyboard layout is good, whereby the input key should be a bit larger.

Battery

The Strix Scar III, which weighs about 5.5 lbs, lasted a bit more than 1.5 hours in the PC Mark 8 Battery Life benchmark, which is quite a good value for a gaming notebook. However, if you play 3D games, you’d better not do it without a socket nearby, because it’s a much faster end of the day here.

Ports

The interface equipment is quite good for a device of this category; Thunderbolt isn’t on board with the four USB ports, though. On the right, there is the slot for the so-called keystone, an NFC-based chip with which a protected drive and personal profiles can be created.

Once the keystone is removed, there is no more access to the shadow drive. This is practical if the notebook is left unattended at LAN parties.

Performance

The Asus ROG Strix Scar III is available in different versions, the one we tested is the best equipped with a Core i9 CPU and RTX2070 graphics. As expected, the benchmark results turn out excellent throughout, this combination doesn’t have any problems with the control of the integrated Full-HD display. Only when a panel with a higher resolution is switched on via HDMI, the graphic card reaches its performance limit in certain games.

All other tasks can easily be done with the Strix Scar; this of course also includes editing large amounts of data, movies or photos. As both a fast SSD in NVMe format and a conventional hard disk are available, the memory space shouldn’t run out that quickly.

Lights and Sound

The notebook’s quality is absolutely fine and appropriate to the proud price; whereby a bit less plastic and a bit more aluminum wouldn’t have done any harm for our taste.

The Asus ROG Strix Scar III can compete with any competitor in terms of case illumination. This also applies to the crystal clear and very powerful sound that comes out of the speakers.

Conclusion

The Asus ROG Strix Scar III can convince with its good performance values and a very well thought-out equipment. If you are looking for a future-proof gaming notebook, you can strike here, making it the Fourth Rank in the best Gaming Laptops for Overwatch.

Ranking Fifth: RAZER BLADE 15 Advanced

RAZER BLADE 15 Advanced review

Pros

  • Good Screen
  • Cheap Price
  • Individualized Versions available

Cons

  • Not easily upgradable

The Lenovo IdeaPad L340-15 is a 4.8 lbs multimedia notebook in the classic 15.6-inch format. It comes standard with a Full HD display, which is only moderately bright with 220 cd/m². This can be a disadvantage when working outdoors, but indoors it’s rather unproblematic. The integrated HD webcam has a mechanical TrueBlock cover. So you don’t have to resort to adhesive tape for your privacy anymore. Also worth mentioning is the long battery life and RapidCharge function.

Technically, the laptop is characterized by its numerous configuration options. You can order it with various Intel and AMD processors: from a simple Pentium to an AMD Ryzen 7 and the high-end Core i7 chip. The ideaPad is available in most versions with an SSD drive (up to 512 GB). The basic model, however, still comes with a classic HDD hard drive (1000 GB).

You can also choose between 8 or 16 GB RAM. You can also choose a graphics card: either the nVidia GeForce MX110 or the MX230. Both belong to the entry-level class, though. An HDMI port serves as video output. In addition, there are 2 USB 3.0 ports, one of which has a type C interface, as well as LAN connection and Bluetooth. Fast ac-WLAN 2×2 enables a smooth Internet connection.

Conclusion

The IdeaPad L340 is, depending on the chosen hardware equipment, between about $500 and $1,000 expensive and places itself as an affordable everyday companion for the digital everyday life at home or also as an office worker. The hardware performance is strongly dependent on the chosen equipment, but for 3D applications only very simple graphics chips or the solutions integrated in the processors are available. The less expensive models come partly without an SSD hard disk, which can provide a good performance boost. We therefore recommend the additional investment in a model with a small SSD for the system.

An IPS panel, which should score with good viewing angle stability and adequate contrast values, awaits you here in the display. The full keyboard with number pad and the generous touchpad guarantee a high level of user comfort, making it the last in our ranking of the best Gaming Laptops for Overwatch.

Overwatch not Starting [Fixed]

How to Fix Overwatch not working.

Everyone is talking about the competitive multiplayer shooter Overwatch. Almost 10 million people have already played the beta version and the success continues. But if you want to play Overwatch and it doesn’t start, it can get very frustrating. In this guide we will show you problems and give you solutions.

Do you want to start Overwatch and it keeps crashing? Some players of the multiplayer shooter complain about some problems and bugs that appear in Overwatch. Often it can’t even be started, which of course drives you to despair. With this guide we want to give you solutions and tips what you can do if Overwatch doesn’t start or causes other errors.

If Overwatch does not start, several different problems may be the reason. By trying some solutions you can often solve the problem quickly. Otherwise, Overwatch’s customer service can also help you.

If Overwatch crashes all the time, you should also check the system requirements of the shooter. Your PC must meet at least the minimum system requirements for Blizzard to ensure that Overwatch runs smoothly on your system. Your operating system should be at least Windows 7. Windows 8 and 8.1 and Windows 10 are supported. Only 64-bit versions of Windows are mentioned in the official requirements.

Also make sure that you have installed the latest Service Pack (SP) for Windows. Visit the official Windows website to download the service packs and to find out which SP is the latest for your version. The official system requirements for Overwatch can be found in our Guide to Starting Overwatch.

If you want to launch Overwatch as usual via the Battle.net client, but the game does not start, go through the following steps in sequence. After each attempt, test if you can start the game now.

  • First, exit and restart the Battle.net client. Then check if you see an update for Overwatch and perform it if necessary.
  • If this did not help, restart your PC once.
  • Delete the cash of the Battle.net client. You can do this by pressing Control + R. Type “%appdata%” in the field without quotes and press Enter. Navigate to “Local > Battlenet > Cash” and delete all files in this folder.
  • Right click the Overwatch EXE and select “Run as administrator”.

“No compatible Graphics card detected”

In this case you probably have a graphics card that does not meet the minimum requirements. If it does, you should update your drivers. If you are using a laptop, you will need to switch from an integrated to a dedicated graphics card. Built-in GPUs usually cause the problem.

How to Fix Controller not detected in Overwatch

The problem here is usually in the .dll files. Search the game files for one named x36ce_x64.dll. Copy it to another location on your computer and rename the original file in the game folder to xinput9_1_0.dll. If you don’t have such a file, you can download the xinput file from the internet. But be especially careful about harmful sites where you can catch viruses or worse.

How to fix Overwatch black screen / crash

If Overwatch crashes on your system, check the minimum system requirements and update your drivers immediately. So far there is no wordaround in form of a patch or hotfix planned, which should reduce this problem as much as possible.

How to contact Overwatch support

If Overwatch simply cannot be started, you should contact the support for Overwatch. In order to be able to help you, it is helpful if you send an MSInfo file directly to the support. You create this file as follows:

  • Press Windows key + R and enter “MSInfo32” in the field. Confirm with Enter.
  • In the system information window, click on “File” at the top and select “Export”.
  • Name the file and remember where you save it.

We hope these tips helped to make Overwatch work on your Laptop or Computer, feel free to write us a comment if you need further assistance, we would love to help you!


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