5 Best Laptops for Adobe Premiere Pro in 2020

| | , , ,

Winner
Razer Blade Stealth 13 Ultrabook Laptop: Intel Core i7-8565U 4-Core, GeForce MX150, 13.3" FHD 1080p, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD - CNC Aluminum - Chroma RGB Lighting - Thunderbolt 3 Compatible
Best Price
MSI PS42 8RB-060 14" Professional Thin Bezel Laptop i5-8250U GeForce MX150 2G GDDR5 8GB RAM 512GB SSD
Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 – 13.5" Touch-Screen – Intel Core i5 - 8GB Memory - 256GB Solid State Drive (Latest Model) – Platinum with Alcantara
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th Gen 14" Ultrabook - 1920 X 1080 - Core i7 i7-8565U - 16 GB RAM - 512 GB SSD - Windows 10 Pro 64-bit - Intel UHD Graphics 620 - in-Plane Switch
MSI GE65 Raider-051 15.6" 240Hz Gaming Laptop, Intel Core i7-9750H, NVIDIA RTX 2070, 16GB, 512GB NVMe SSD, Win10, VR Ready
Model
Blade Stealth 13
PS42
Surface Laptop 3
ThinkPad X1
GE65
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 9.3/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 8.8/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 8.6/10 Good April 2020
Test Result 8.4/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
MSI
Microsoft
Lenovo
MSI
RAM
16GB
8GB
8GB
16 GB
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-8565U 4-Core
Intel i5-8250U
Intel Core i5
Intel Core i7 i7-8565U
Intel Core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
GeForce MX150
GeForce MX150 2G
Radeon RX Vega 11 Graphics
Intel UHD Graphics 620
NVIDIA RTX 2070
Storage Capacity
1TB SSD
512GB SSD
256GB SSD
512 GB SSD
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
2.89 lbs
2.6 lbs
3.4 lbs
4.11 lbs
5.49 lbs
Pros
  • Best Performance
  • Great Display Quality
  • Long Lasting Battery
  • Best Price
  • Powerful Hardware
  • Lightweight
  • Good Performance
  • Slim Design
  • Touchscreen
  • Awesome Display
  • Ergonomic (Very Comfortable)
  • Great Battery
  • Great Performance
  • Fast and Good Display
  • Lightweight
Cons
  • RAM not upgradable
  • No Thunderbolt Port
  • Could have more Ports
  • No SIM card slot
  • Gets a bit loud under workload
Winner
Razer Blade Stealth 13 Ultrabook Laptop: Intel Core i7-8565U 4-Core, GeForce MX150, 13.3" FHD 1080p, 16GB RAM, 1TB SSD - CNC Aluminum - Chroma RGB Lighting - Thunderbolt 3 Compatible
Model
Blade Stealth 13
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
Razer
RAM
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-8565U 4-Core
Graphics Card
GeForce MX150
Storage Capacity
1TB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
2.89 lbs
Pros
  • Best Performance
  • Great Display Quality
  • Long Lasting Battery
Cons
  • RAM not upgradable
Best Price
MSI PS42 8RB-060 14" Professional Thin Bezel Laptop i5-8250U GeForce MX150 2G GDDR5 8GB RAM 512GB SSD
Model
PS42
Test Result
Test Result 9.3/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
MSI
RAM
8GB
CPU
Intel i5-8250U
Graphics Card
GeForce MX150 2G
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
2.6 lbs
Pros
  • Best Price
  • Powerful Hardware
  • Lightweight
Cons
  • No Thunderbolt Port
Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 – 13.5" Touch-Screen – Intel Core i5 - 8GB Memory - 256GB Solid State Drive (Latest Model) – Platinum with Alcantara
Model
Surface Laptop 3
Test Result
Test Result 8.8/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Microsoft
RAM
8GB
CPU
Intel Core i5
Graphics Card
Radeon RX Vega 11 Graphics
Storage Capacity
256GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
3.4 lbs
Pros
  • Good Performance
  • Slim Design
  • Touchscreen
Cons
  • Could have more Ports
Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th Gen 14" Ultrabook - 1920 X 1080 - Core i7 i7-8565U - 16 GB RAM - 512 GB SSD - Windows 10 Pro 64-bit - Intel UHD Graphics 620 - in-Plane Switch
Model
ThinkPad X1
Test Result
Test Result 8.6/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
RAM
16 GB
CPU
Intel Core i7 i7-8565U
Graphics Card
Intel UHD Graphics 620
Storage Capacity
512 GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
4.11 lbs
Pros
  • Awesome Display
  • Ergonomic (Very Comfortable)
  • Great Battery
Cons
  • No SIM card slot
MSI GE65 Raider-051 15.6" 240Hz Gaming Laptop, Intel Core i7-9750H, NVIDIA RTX 2070, 16GB, 512GB NVMe SSD, Win10, VR Ready
Model
GE65
Test Result
Test Result 8.4/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
MSI
RAM
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA RTX 2070
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.49 lbs
Pros
  • Great Performance
  • Fast and Good Display
  • Lightweight
Cons
  • Gets a bit loud under workload

You love to cut and edit videos on Premiere Pro, whether as a hobby for YouTube or as a job? Then you need a powerful laptop with fast hardware, enough storage space and of course a high-quality, high-resolution display. In this article we will show you the best Laptops for Adobe Premiere Pro and give you and in-depth review of each Laptop below. Also we will show you the first steps on how to use Adobe Pro properly.

Ranking First: Razer Blade Stealth 13

Razer Blade Stealth 13 review


Pros

  • Best Performance
  • Great Display Quality
  • Long Lasting Battery

Cons

  • RAM not upgradeable

Good gaming performance, good battery life, bright display and an excellent keyboard: Buyers hardly make a mistake with the Razer Blade Stealth 13 – unless they buy the 4K version.

Compact gaming notebooks don’t necessarily have it easy on the market; after all, users demand many things at once. A portable gaming notebook must be able to go a long time without a power outlet and should be as compact, light and pretty as possible. A good keyboard and a bright display are a matter of course, just like acceptable frame rates in Adobe Premier Pro.

With all these points in mind, it’s hardly surprising that almost all gaming devices concentrate on one thing and are less convincing in other areas. Mostly, battery life and portability are neglected in favor of performance.

Razer’s Blade Stealth 13 is a surprising exception and convinces us in the test in almost all points. It can call itself the best gaming notebook for on the go without exaggerating. Gamers looking for a work tool with gaming options are well served here. We can rarely say that the investment of at least $1400 for the test configuration we were given is really worth it.

Razer has sent us two different versions of the 13 inch gaming notebook, one with a Full HD panel and an otherwise identical model with an optional 4K display. Both devices use an Intel Core i7-1065G7 of the current Ice Lake generation, 16 GByte RAM and a 512 GByte NVMe SSD. A dedicated GPU from Nvidia – the Geforce GTX 1650 Max-Q – also provides for the gaming performance.

Design

However, it is still possible to have the individual LEDs and the keyboard light up in different colours as desired. The gaming aspect of the notebook is still visible here. We find the simple design suitable – especially if we want to use the device away from games in Adobe Premier Pro or when travelling. The weight of about 1,400 grams is just about right.

The manufacturing quality of the Blade Stealth 13 is still excellent. Nothing wobbles or creaks here. The hinge is also rigid enough to keep the panel stable. The rough aluminum surface also feels very good again and reminds of its predecessor. However, this is also accompanied by the fact that fingerprints and dirt on the device quickly show up.

Ports

For a 13.3 inch notebook, the Blade Stealth 13 once again has a very good connectivity. We can use a Thunderbolt 3 port, a USB type C port (3.2 Gen2) and two USB A sockets (3.2 Gen1). For comparison: The Dell XPS 13 (9380), which is used as a reference in many cases, has one USB type C port less. However, we can’t use one of the USB-C ports without an adapter in mains operation because the included power adapter occupies it. We also lack an SD card reader, which is present in most business devices.

Keyboard and Trackpad

The keyboard and trackpad are convincing again. The flat and large keys of the Stealth 13 have a short switching path and a soft pressure point. The quick release of the keys can be an advantage in games and provides a pleasant typing feel. Also surprising: Razer installs full-size arrow keys that can be used in games to move the character or when programming to navigate the source code.

Razer has also enlarged the trackpad once again. It’s reminiscent of the touchpad on the Macbook Air or the current Surface Laptop 3. We never have the feeling of wanting to connect a mouse when working. We can’t say the same about some other devices, such as the Sony Vaio SX14.

Performance

The Geforce GTX 1650 Max-Q with a power budget of 35 watts is especially popular in smaller gaming notebooks. We could also already try the GPU on the 15 inch Dell XPS 15 (7590). It also performs satisfactorily in Full HD resolution in the Razer Blade Stealth 13, as long as we lower the graphics details a bit.

In the tactical shooter, The Division, we achieve a well playable 49 fps on the medium default setting and in native resolution. It’s still 40 fps in high details. Borderlands 3 is similarly demanding. Here we also measure 49 fps at medium settings.

The likewise graphically demanding title Shadow of the Tomb Raider runs on high presets in native resolution and with motion blur turned off at 39 fps. More fluid 49 fps are possible in medium details. Especially at higher detail levels, micro judder is strongly visible despite acceptable frame rates.

The competitive Shooter Counter Strike Global Offensive, on the other hand, is no problem for the gaming notebook. Here we measure well playable 75 fps even in high details and don’t feel any strong frame drops. We achieve a stable 95 fps in medium details and a reduced 2x MSAA. The Geforce GTX 1650 Max-Q is completely sufficient in such titles.

What we do notice, though: The performance of the Ice Lake processor isn’t necessarily convincing, at least in the benchmark scenario. The Core i7-1065G7 manages a sobering 975 points in Cinebench R20 with its eight threads. Here we note that Razer’s CPU was limited to a 12 watt performance budget. It clocks with 1.6 GHz per core under load. It heats up comparatively little with about 55 degrees Celsius.

This at least has the advantage that the system never gets too loud at any time. The two small fans are audible in Adobe Premiere Pro, but they don’t interfere, as it is the case with some other gaming notebooks. We are sometimes even very surprised how quiet the small coolers are – even when playing demanding titles like Shadow of the Tom Raider.

However, we wouldn’t recommend the Blade Stealth 13 unconditionally for CPU-intensive activities – especially video editing and long 3D rendering. Some short sequences can be rendered in Adobe Premiere CC almost on a good level, which is partly due to the temporary strong turbo clock of up to 3.8 GHz, but is largely due to the dedicated Geforce GPU. Besides the Nvidia GPU, the integrated Intel graphics unit also steps in with Quicksync. The notebook calculates 1:22 minutes for a 1:28 minute long clip in 1080p. If we switch off the GPU support, this time increases to 4:22 minutes.

Razer installs a 512 GByte Lite-On CA3 (8D512 S) in the Blade Stealth 13. The performance of the relatively little-known NVMe SSD from Taiwan is still very good: We measured 3,100 MByte/s sequential read rate and 2,024 MByte/s sequential write rate. An advantage is that we can easily upgrade them. However, the 16 GByte RAM are hard-soldered and not expandable.

The integrated 46 watt hour battery is also exchangeable, which performs noticeably differently in the 4K and 1080p models. There are other directly visible and less obvious reasons why the Blade Stealth 13 with 4K panel is unnecessary in our opinion.

Display

If we place both Razer devices directly next to each other, we can see the differences between the two panel types. The 4K display shows colors more saturated and with much better contrasts. A touchscreen for finger input is also integrated. The 4K resolution can also be an advantage, especially when we work with several windows next to each other. Netflix series and film material also look fantastic due to the very good black values.

However, the 4K panel is not anti-reflective and reflections can quickly interfere with gaming and working. The 1080p display is also noticeably brighter. We measured 422 cd/m² illumination in comparison to the 323 cd/m² of the 4K version. We can only play older games like CS:GO in native 4K. Both The Division 2 and Shadow of the Tomb Raider are too much for the GPU in the four times higher resolution.

What bothers us the most: The 4K panel negates a strength of the Razer Blade Stealth 13. The battery life is halved. It’s quite good in the less demanding benchmark Powermark with a preset brightness of 200 cd/m² in the Full HD model. We measured a satisfying 9:17 hours. The same test on the 4K model results in only a below average 5:21 hours. The notebook with LC panel also performs well in the Stranger Things marathon on Netflix. We measured 7:26 hours at 200 cd/m².

This pattern continues in PCMark8, which simulates video chats and casual gaming as well as word processing. The Stealth 13 Full HD achieves 3:56 hours here, the 4K variant only a weak 2:30 hours. Generally, we have to expect shorter runtimes if the dedicated graphic card has to be used – for example, in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Whether gamer, video editer or both: The Razer Blade Stealth 13 can convince us in virtually every respect. The device has already become noticeably more mature, simpler and less obtrusive. The manufacturing quality is still excellent. The display edges have become narrower.

We like the keyboard and trackpad very much. The keys have a soft pressure point and are pleasantly large. The trackpad can be used well as a mouse replacement due to its grown sensor surface.

Two USB-A ports, a Thunderbolt 3 connector and USB-C form a satisfactory selection of connections. We can better cope with the missing SD card reader with this.

We would only recommend the Blade Stealth’s 13.3 inch panel in the 1080p resolution version, though. The 4K panel has a higher contrast and a touchscreen, but it glows noticeably darker and reflects. It’s also very important that the battery life is almost halved.

The 1080p model manages a good 9:17 hours under light load in Powermark. The display is matt and shines beautifully bright with 422 cd/m². We hardly hear the notebook’s fans under full load, which is a plus when working Adobe Premiere Pro.

The Geforce GTX 1650 Max-Q performs well in Adobe Premier Pro. The Ice Lake chip is also suitable for short video rendering projects. Longer-term computing loads are probably less advisable due to the rather low core rate under load.

For the price, there’s probably hardly a better notebook available that is as versatile as the Razer Blade Stealth 13. We would use it without hesitation as a full-time workstation at trade fairs, on the desk and in an airplane.

Ranking Second: MSI PS42

MSI PS42 review


Pros

  • Best Price
  • Powerful Hardware
  • Nice Design

Cons

  • No Thunderbolt Port

MSI has expanded its portfolio with a noble and mobile ultra slim notebook, which we liked right away. Everything is just right with the PS42. From the aluminum case to the inner hardware.

MSI has equipped the PS42 8RB-038 Prestige with an anti-reflective 14 inch display that covers almost 100% of the sRGB color space. This will please many Adobe Premiere Pro users. A latest-generation Intel Core i7 is used for the computing power, which gets support in graphics through an Nvidia Geforce MX150. The long battery life also surprised us. The battery lasted a proud 8 hours in the benchmark.

Display

The 14 inch display of the PS42 8RB-038 Prestige has an extremely thin bezel. The average illumination is a good 265 cd/m². The maximum resolution is 1,920 x 1,080 pixels, which is Full HD.

The PS42’s wide-view display works with True Color technology, so that the sRGB coverage is almost 100%. The viewing angle is very good and the screen content can be viewed from all angles without any losses.

Because the display frame is so narrow, MSI has placed the HD webcam and the microphones under the screen.

Hardware

MSI was able to build strong hardware into the aluminum housing. The ultra slim notebook is driven by an Intel Core i7 of the 8th generation. The QuadCore processor works at a basic clock rate of 1.8 GHz, which is raised to 4 GHz in turbo mode. The Intel CPU has 8 GB of RAM available.

In addition to the integrated UHD graphics, MSI has also been able to accommodate a dedicated Nvidia graphics. The Geforce MX150 has its own memory of 2 GB. Switching between the two graphics solutions is done either automatically or via the Nvidia graphics’ system control.

The PS42 8RB-038 Prestige Ultra Slim has an M.2 module with 256 GB capacity as data memory. This still has about 175 GB free memory in the delivery state. With 3,159 MB/s, the M.2 module is extremely fast when reading data. When writing, the transfer rate drops to only 1,218 MB/s.

The network connection is via a fast WLAN. External devices such as keyboard, mouse or headset can also be connected via Bluetooth. With the integrated battery you can use the MSI PS42 8RB-038 Prestige Ultra Slim for 8 hours on the road.

Ports

MSI has been able to accommodate four USB sockets on the 15.9 mm flat aluminum housing. Two sockets even comply with the Type C standard. Thunderbolt is not supported, however. You can use an external monitor via the HDMI port without an adapter. The card reader placed on the right side is suitable for SD, SDHC and SDXC memory cards.

On the left side of the case you find the combined audio jack, the power supply connector and three LED lights.

Keyboard and Trackpad

The keys all have a pleasant size and when typing you feel a small pressure point. MSI has also thought about a backlight, which makes typing much easier in dim light. The arrangement of the FN and >< keys is a bit unusual. MSI has placed them to the right of the space bar. The hashtag key also has an unusual size.

In the front of the wrist-rest there is a multi-touchpad. MSI has included the fingerprint reader in this.

Upgrading

The petite beauty from MSI has problems when opening. All screws could be removed – even those under the warranty seal – but the underside refused to come off. The aluminum case was too bad for us and so we can’t show you a picture of the interior this time.

Heating

The keyboard side warmed up in several places in our stress test. The thermal imaging camera could find a hotspot of 51.9 degrees in the rear area. The underside also heated up considerably, in places even up to 61 degrees Celsius. The hardware’s power dissipation is dissipated via ventilation slits, which are located at the back between the display and the base unit. Temperatures of up to 49.1 degrees were measured here.

The ventilation system was audible in the stress test, but at no time was it disturbing.
The notebook’s small charging adapter also heated up in the stress test. We could measure up to 44 degrees Celsius here.

Conclusion

MSI did everything right with the PS42 8RB-038 Prestige. The silver aluminum case not only looks very high-quality, but also gives the 15.9 mm thin notebook the necessary stability. The 14 inch display with almost 100% sRGB coverage is anti-reflective and offers a resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels. Touch was dispensed with. MSI has been able to accommodate a latest-generation Intel Core i7, a Geforce MX150 and 8 GB RAM in the aluminum case. Windows 10 Home is pre-installed on the super-fast M.2 module with 256 GB. We were surprised by the integrated battery, which lasts a whole working day.

Ranking Third: Microsoft Surface Laptop 3

Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 review


Pros

  • Good Performance
  • Slim Design
  • Touchscreen

Cons

  • Could have more Ports

The Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 is a feast for the eyes – peppered with new technology. The test checks whether the notebook combines both in a sensible way.
The 13.5-inch version of the Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 relies exclusively on Intel processors. Unlike the 15-inch model, which is also available with an AMD Ryzen, there is no CPU alternative for the small Surface, which weighs just under 2.2 lbs.

Design

Like its predecessors, the new clamshell notebook from Microsoft is distinguished by its flawless design: The elegant, flat metal case is absolutely solid and torsionally stiff, and can be opened easily with one hand. Microsoft offers the Surface Laptop 3 in the colours sandstone, black and circuit board. There are also models in cobalt blue and platinum with the well-known Alcantara fabric cover.

Performance

The core processor from the 10th generation gives the Surface Laptop high computing power. This makes it around ten to 15 percent faster than comparable equipped notebooks with a Core i7 from the Whiskey Lake generation. In system benchmarks such as the PC Mark 10, the Surface Laptop 3 is thus one of the fastest notebooks without a dedicated graphics card. Like many flat notebooks, however, the CPU cannot keep up the pace in longer load phases: In the Cinebench processor test, the result after ten runs is reduced by up to 25 percent. However, even then the fan remains reasonably quiet and hardly disturbs with an even noise.

An NVMe-SSD from Toshiba is in the test device, which can be removed. The BG4 doesn’t come close to Samsung SSDs, which many notebook manufacturers use in their top models, in terms of the sequential data rate. But it keeps up well with distributed accesses, which are more important in everyday computing. During the test of the 3D performance, the same problems appear as in the Surface Pro 7 with the same graphics solution: 3DMark crashes reproducibly in many tests. In the runs that Iris Plus handles, it comes close to dedicated entry-level GPUs like the Nvidia MX150 and is at the speed level of the Vega 9 GPU in the Ryzen version of Surface Laptop 3.

Battery

The surface notebook combines the strong computing power with a very decent endurance: In the WLAN test, it lasts over ten hours – a very decent result considering the high display resolution. Also praiseworthy: The Surface battery charges quickly and is 82 percent full again after an hour at the power outlet.

Display, Keyboard and Touchscreen

The 13.5-inch screen displays the 3:2 aspect ratio with a resolution of 2256 x 1504 pixels, as is usual for Surface devices. Its maximum brightness is an average of just under 370 cd/m², which despite the glossy surface of the touchscreen also allows working outdoors. The color space coverage is 95 percent sRGB and 72 percent AdobeRGB – a good result, but one that most other notebooks in this price range also achieve. Only a few laptops with HDR display are better off here.

The touch screen can also be operated with the Surface Pen, which is not included with the Surface Laptop 3. A disadvantage of Surface laptops has always been the limited number of interfaces: This is hardly noticeable if you use the notebook mainly on the road. But if it is to be used as a desktop computer, this lack of equipment can speak against the Surface – unless you want to spend $200 for the appropriate docking station: Because for peripherals it only offers a USB 3.0 socket (Type A) and the Type C connection. An audio connection is also provided. A card reader is missing, as is a fingerprint sensor, by the way. You can still log in biometrically on the Surface via the front camera, which supports Windows Hello.

The keyboard with backlighting convinces with a clear keystroke point and a good stroke. It stays quiet even when typing fast, only the space bar is noticeable negatively. The large storage area for the palms is also pleasant. The touchpad’s verdict is just as positive, as it provides a clear feedback when clicking the mouse, but doesn’t get loud. Multi-finger gestures can also be implemented well on the grippy surface.

Conclusion

The Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 is one of the most elegant notebooks for on the go. The visual appearance is only at the expense of the interface equipment: although type C is now on board, productive workers cannot avoid a docking station. But you don’t have to make any compromises, especially when it comes to computing power. Battery life and screen quality are also impressive. Owners of the predecessor model should only change over if they absolutely need the performance increase.

Ranking Fourth: Lenovo X1 Carbon

Lenovo X1 Carbon review


Pros

  • Awesome Display
  • Ergonomic (Very Comfortable)
  • Great Battery

Cons

  • No SIM card slot

The X1 Carbon from Lenovo has become slimmer. But not every innovation pleases. And the competition is stronger than ever.

They are considered the measure of all things in the notebook world: The Thinkpads X1 Carbon from the Chinese manufacturer Lenovo are the reference in the upper class, noble models for directors and managers, robust, mature and thus an object of desire. The good name counts, as HP, Dell and other manufacturers naturally also lure with attractive Windows devices, and most of them are even significantly cheaper.

The Thinkpad X1 Carbon has been available since 2012 and now the seventh generation is about to be launched. The new model is thinner and lighter. It loses two centimeters in width, so that the dimensions are now 32.3 × 21.7 × 1.5 centimeters. The weight reduction is only in the gram range, the new X1 Carbon weighs 2.38 lbs and therefore remains an especially light notebook that is a pleasure to carry in a briefcase. Another striking feature is that the on/off switch is no longer located above the row of function keys, but is moved to the right side of the case. The combination slot for micro SD and sim cards on the back gives way to a slot for an optional LTE module with a sim card.

To stick with the outward appearance: If you buy the Thinkpad with the top display, you can order the lid with a woven carbon fiber structure on request. Then there’s the option for a webcam, which combines two features: The camera lens can be blocked with a physical aperture, an optimal protection against spying. An infrared camera for biometric authentication is also integrated.

Display

You may be spoilt with choices when it comes to finding the right display. With a fixed diagonal of 14 inches, five displays are available, the cheapest in Full HD resolution with a brightness of 300 and 400 candelas per square meter. In our opinion, the display more suitable for business use has a resolution of 2560 × 1440 pixels, but isn’t particularly bright at 300 candelas per square meter. Our test device offered the 4K resolution (3840 × 2160 pixels) with HDR and 500 candelas per square meter. That’s all well and good, but the catch is that this 4K display is reflective, a reason for exclusion for us. It should not be concealed that the display otherwise locks perfectly at any chosen angle and can be turned backwards by a maximum of 180 degrees.

Models

Lenovo accommodates the connection for a Kensington lock and a conventional USB port next to the power switch on the right side. On the left, there are two USB type C ports with Thunderbolt, another USB port as well as HDMI and a headphone-microphone port as a jack socket. Bluetooth is now supported in version 5, and four microphones are built in, Lenovo says, but you can’t see them. Even the cheapest version of the Thinkpad X1 Carbon is expensive. With an eighth-generation Core i5 processor, 8 gigabytes of main memory and 256 gigabytes of SSD, as well as a Full HD display, $1400 are already called up. Only in the more expensive versions is Windows 10 Pro installed, the prices start at $1800. In the top configuration with 16 gigabytes of memory and a 2-terabyte SSD, the $2200 limit is exceeded.

Keyboard and Battery

The keyboard of the new Thinkpad unfortunately has to make do with a reduced key stroke in comparison to the previous model. The fan, however, starts up less often than in the previous model. The shrinking cure for the case is also accompanied by a reduction of the battery performance. Instead of 57 watt hours, there are now only 51 watt hours. Nevertheless, the manufacturer states a battery life of 18.3 hours, which can’t be achieved in practice. One rather reckons with around eight hours.

Conclusion

All in all, the Thinkpad X1 Carbon remains a robust, optimally manufactured device for Premiere Pro users. But not all the changes of the latest generation are a plus, and the competition is stronger than ever in our ranking of the best Laptops for Adobe Premiere Pro.

Ranking Fifth: MSI GE65 Raider

MSI GE65 Raider


Pros

  • Great Performance
  • Fast and Good Display
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Gets a bit loud under workload

It’s the inner values that matter: Although the chassis of the MSI GE65 Raider doesn’t look extraordinary, there is a current six-core processor from Intel and a Geforce RTX graphics unit inside. There is also room for two SSDs and two RAM modules.

There are still plenty of gaming notebooks packed with technology. However, the thickest equipment is not always required. A model number smaller usually does the trick, but you save some height and especially weight. But you still have to put just under $1700 on the counter for such a device, as our review of the MSI GE65 Raider shows.

The MSI GE65 Raider is purely from the data sheet a very well equipped notebook of the gaming class. It is always driven by an Intel Core i7-7700HQ based on Kaby-Lake and a modern Pascal graphic card. The buyer can choose between a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 with 3 or 6 GB of video memory or a faster GeForce GTX 1070 with 8 GB VRAM. The display always measures 15.6 inches in its diagonal and has a native resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels. Either a viewing angle-stable IPS panel or a TN model is installed, which offers a high reaction speed of 120 Hz and thus primarily appeals to the ambitious shooter gamer.

In addition, there is a fast PCI Express SSD including additional magnetic storage, a SteelSeries keyboard with RGB backlight, killer network chips and modern connections up to USB 3.1 Type-C. High-quality loudspeakers are just as important as WiFi and Bluetooth as well as a powerful but quiet cooling system.

All this is built into a comparatively compact housing with a height of 27.5 mm and a total weight of about 4.85 lbs.

Design

The MSI GE65 Raider is inevitably a notebook from MSI. As is now typical for the manufacturer, they have opted for a comparatively simple case, whose color variety is limited to black and red and a few silver accents, at least when it’s turned off. Thus, the manufacturer’s logo and the typical dragon emblem of the gaming sector adorn the screen lid. Here and there, there are a few creases and a few red color accents. The device looks very angular, but is overall quite compact.

The choice of materials is also typical for MSI. Whilst the top case and screen lid are made of black brushed aluminum and thus very susceptible to annoying fingerprints, the rest of the chassis is made of plastic. This doesn’t do any harm to the stability, on the contrary: The MSI GE65 Raider is excellently manufactured. There are no sharp edges, unclean gaps or smooth-running hinges. The case is very stable even under strong pressure. Even the small ventilation slits on the back and bottom are very stable.

As with most gaming notebooks, SteelSeries has been used for the keyboard. The chiclet keys have a good pressure point with a medium stroke and are thus not only suitable for gaming, but also for creating longer text passages. It’s also praiseworthy that MSI hasn’t waived on a number pad despite the 15.6 inch alignment.

The WASD keys, which are typical for gamers, aren’t highlighted separately in color, but this can be done afterwards thanks to the RGB backlight. In opposition to its predecessor, the GE65 Raider’s backlighting can’t only be divided into zones, but can be set individually for each key.

Ports

On the connection side, the MSI GE65 Raider offers a lot. On the left side of the device there is a Gigabit interface with killer function, an HDMI output, a mini DisplayPort connector and a type A and C interface. The latter is wrongly displayed as Thunderbolt 3 in our test device via the small flash logo, but it isn’t. The GE65 is only available without the TB-3 protocol. If Intel will abolish the license costs for it in the course of this year, MSI will probably upgrade the interface with the next generation of devices without having to rework the case. Otherwise there are two gold-plated 3.5 mm jacks for connecting a headset.

Opposite, there are only two USB 3.1 interfaces as well as a card reader and the connection for the external 230 W power supply unit.

Cooling

Unfortunately there is no maintenance door on the MSI GE65 Raider. If you want to exchange SSD, RAM or hard disk, you have to remove the complete bottom side and loosen eleven screws. This is much easier with other devices in this price and performance class.

The cooling proves to be very unobtrusive, especially in view of the Intel Core i7-7700HQ and the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070. There are only a few air inlets and outlets on the bottom and on the back directly behind the screen. Processor and graphics card are each kept separately at temperature by a separate radial fan and a sophisticated heat pipe system.

Praiseworthy: A key, which is located directly below the power button on the keyboard, can be used to bring the cooling to maximum performance. The fans are brought to their full running performance with just one press.

Performance

The heart of the MSI GE65 Raider is an Intel Core i7-7700HQ. Like all current notebook processors in the gaming sector, it runs from the tape in 14-nm mode and originates from the Kaby-Lake architecture. The processor has four native computing cores, which thanks to SMT support can each process two threads at the same time and can work at speeds of 2.8 to 3.8 GHz in basic and turbo clock. In addition, there is a class standard 6 MB L3 cache and a 1 MB cache in the second row. The front-row data and instruction cache provides 32 KB of data memory each.

Intel specifies the maximum power consumption with 45 W TDP. This limit is also exhausted in our test device of the MSI GE65 Raider under full load.

Although the data sheet speaks of only a single SODIMM bar, our test device contains two modules at once, which were connected in fast dual channel mode. Both are fired with a speed of 2,400 MHz and thus bring it to a memory bandwidth of 23.91 GB/s. The M.2 SSD is connected via SATA and thus provides an average reading speed of around 552.7 MB/s. Writing is done with about 490.7 MB/s. The magnetic memory hard disk as an additional data grab reads data at 127 MB/s, but writes at about 123.9 MB/s only slightly slower. The HDD is therefore still fast enough for games.

Thus, the MSI GE65 Raider brings it from 7-Zip to 21,089 MIPS in the compression test and thus performs a bit more than many other gaming notebooks in this price and performance category, which like to fail at the 20,000 mark. The Intel Core i7-7700HQ finishes the two render benchmarks, Cinebench R11.5 and Cinebench R15 in multi-core setting with 8.18 and 736 points, respectively, and is thus well in the average.

If you need even more memory or want a fast M.2 SSD with PCIe connection, you can upgrade it yourself thanks to a second slot, but there is no maintenance cover for this.

Much more important for the gamer than the simple system performance is of course the graphics card. Our test device here is powered by an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 and thus has the second fastest Pascal model currently available for notebooks. Only the GeForce GTX 1080 would have been faster – apart from the more power-saving and efficient Max-Q models.

The mobile NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 is almost as powerful as its desktop sister model – NVIDIA is only talking about a performance loss of around 10%. In order for this to work, the clock rates have been significantly reduced, but the number of shader units has also been tightened. While the solution from the standalone computer provides a total of 1,920 shader units, the mobile version of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 has 2,048 units. The clock rates for chip and memory are only 1,480 and 2,002 MHz respectively. At least the graphic chip can also reach frequencies of at least 1.695 MHz thanks to Turbo Boost. In practice this is also achieved by our MSI GE65 Raider, but in the absolute worst case scenario, which we usually simulate with Prime95 and Furmark, the clock rate drops to around 1.392 MHz for a short time, which is a bit below NVIDIA’s specifications. The promised 1.7 GHz are easily reached in normal gaming mode.

There are no adjustments to the memory expansion compared to the desktop version. Both versions have access to an 8 GB GDDR5 video memory, which is accessed via a 256 bit wide interface. Together with a clock rate of 2.0 GHz, a memory bandwidth of up to 256.3 GB/s is achieved. Like most current Pascal chips, the GP104 chip with its 7.2 billion transistors is manufactured at TSMC using the 16-nm FinFET process.

Current game titles are no problem for the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 and thus for the MSI GE65 Raider.

Battery

The MSI GE65 raider is supplied with power via an external 230 W power supply unit. On the way the gaming bolide has to be satisfied with a battery with 47.3 Wh. In view of the Intel Core i7-7700HQ and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070’s hunger for power, it is still enough for just over three hours in office mode, but the runtime drops to only 47 minutes in gaming mode and thus isn’t even enough for a whole gaming hour. Other devices partly offer considerably longer runtimes here.

The battery is charged after just under two hours. Then the MSI GE665 Raider 15.9 and 197.7 W in office and gaming mode. Even up to 222.8 W are reached under absolute full load. But these are quite acceptable rates due to the powerful hardware. Because MSI does without G-Sync in favor of Optimus, the idle rates are still right.

Display

The display of our test position is made by Chi Mei and is a TN panel. It’s not quite as stable from the viewing angle – especially when viewed from below – as an IPS model, but it is very responsive at 120 Hz. With a maximum brightness of 292 cd/m², outdoor use is only conditionally recommended, but the homogeneity of the illumination is good at around 89% – only 36 cd/m² lie between the brightest and darkest values. The contrast ratio of 1.178:1 is again very good.

Many current gaming notebooks have to struggle with a partly very pronounced blue cast. This does not apply to our test model of the MSI GE65 Raider. With an average color temperature of 6,544 K, the Chi-Mei panel almost reaches the optimal value of 6,500 K.

Otherwise, the display measures 15.6 inches in its diagonal and has a resolution of 1,920 x 1,080 pixels – G-Sync is omitted in favor of Optimus technology.

Conclusion

The MSI GE65 Raider is a very fast gaming notebook in the upper class, which is between many other competing devices in this price and performance class and the very compact Max-Q models such as the ASUS ROG Zephyrus GX501. Despite the Intel Core i7-7700HQ and the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 as well as the comparatively compact design, there are no problems with cooling. CPU and GPU can always call up their maximum performance in gaming mode. All our benchmarks and Adobe Premiere Pro are no problem for the 15 incher – even in the highest settings, playable 60 FPS is always achieved.

Everyday performance is also good thanks to fast memory and an M.2 SSD with SATA-III connection. Keyboard and mouse also allow longer working hours in front of the device. The RGB backlight is well thought out and goes far beyond simple bling bling. The workmanship is excellent, the display is well calibrated, but a bit too dark.

Adobe Premiere Pro Guide in 2020

Premiere Pro Guide

If we have now successfully opened the program, we are on the start screen. Here we see our last projects centrally and can open them by clicking on them and then continue editing. Here we can also see when we opened them last and how big they are. On the left side, we can also switch to a training area, where we get helpful tutorials about the program from Adobe directly. If you have used an older or different version of Adobe Premiere Pro, on which you would like to apply the settings, you can also do this here.

Here you can import settings from another Adobe account or synchronize settings from older versions. Now we can also select an existing project from our computer or access our Adobe Premiere Rush projects and edit them directly in Adobe Premiere Pro. I’ve given you a basic course on what Premiere Rush is and how it makes it easier for you to edit video with fewer options. But now we also have the opportunity to create a new project. Once we have clicked on it, a new window opens where we can give the project a name. Here we also have to define a location on our device where your Premiere Pro project file should be saved.

You have to define this at the beginning, so that the automatic saving and the like can be used. Now we can make some more settings, where we can define what our videos can be rendered with. Here there is often the possibility to do this via the graphics cards, which relieves your processor a bit. Under video we can determine whether we want to use time or frame information, I use time information here, because we are more used to it.

Under working drives we could now define for each storage where to store them. Here it is always a good idea to do this like the project, because then everything is in one place. You should only change this here if your storage space is too limited. Why are video recordings stored where at all? That’s because when you import content, Adobe Premiere Pro converts it so that you can work with it smoothly in your project, and the files are stored there. The same goes for audio and other stuff. Under Import Settings, you can also specify whether files should be copied when you import them, but we won’t use that in this basic course. If you click Ok, the project has been created and we are in the program overview.

How to Import Data into Premiere Pro

Now let’s take a look at how you can load and manage your videos in your project and then edit them in Premiere. Importing and managing your files is done exclusively in the Project window. If you can’t find it on your computer, you can also open it in the Window section. You now have several options for importing your videos, audio, and graphics. The easiest way is to drag the files into the Projects window. Then your files will appear directly in it. In the lower right corner, you can also see from the blue bar that the files are being made ready for Adobe Premiere Pro. If the blue bar is gone, it means you should be able to use the files without any problems. You can also import your items by right-clicking in the program or using the menu under File. Adobe Premiere Pro supports the most popular video, audio, and image formats. You can also import other Adobe project files, such as PSDs from Photoshop or Illustrator files, into Adobe Premiere Pro with ease and use some of them in complex ways.

If we have imported our files now, we will find them here arranged one below the other. Here we can also see the different meta data of our clips next to the name, i.e. how many frames per second the video has, how long it is and much more. In front of it we also have a small symbol which shows us what kind of media it is, i.e. video, graphics or audio. Before all things we have also still another colored marking, which we can change also over the right clicking on the clip, then we can align similar clips by these markings in color, whether so a better overview to receive. But we can also switch to a grid overview under half, where we see less metadata but a preview image, which also happens when we drive over it. Basically, if we double-tap on a clip, it will be displayed in the source window and we can view it in the source window without having to add it to a sequence.

Now there is also the free-form view, where we can switch to a third view where we can place all the videos freely in the window. So we can create a storyboard or a rough arrangement of the clips as we want them to be in the final video. This is useful if you have a lot of clips to keep track of. Now you can also set the size of the clips at the bottom of the window and on the right side we can also search for a clip or create a folder. So we also have an easy way to sort the files. Once we have selected a clip, we can also delete it from our project using the lower right corner. The clip will then only be removed in Adobe Premiere Pro, but it will remain on your computer. Now we can also use the New button in Adobe Premiere Pro to create color areas, setting layers, subtitles and color bars, but more at a relevant point.

How to Create a sequence in Adobe Premiere Pro

How to create a sequence in Adobe Premiere Pro

You may be asking yourself, how do I edit a video now? We don’t see a timeline, even though we created a project and imported files. That’s because Premiere Pro works with sequences, so you have to create a sequence in which you can edit your video and then export it. The handy thing about it is that you can create multiple sequences in a project that have different formats, qualities, and so on, and you can also use sequences in sequence to cut a project or scenes in a wise way.

You can create a new sequence in the project window under New. Here a new window will open where you have to set the defaults, e.g. resolution, quality and co. for the sequence. Here you have the possibility to choose from various presets or to set the presets yourself under Settings under Custom.

Under Timebase you can set how many frames per second FPS your sequence should have. It is said that from 24 frames per second on, you will no longer see single frames, but a smooth video. So you should not go below 25 FPS here. I usually use 30 here, which is a solid number. Meanwhile it goes even higher, but which is mostly unnecessary for normal projects.

Under frame size we can enter the pixel width and height for our video. Here we can also see our aspect ratio. Here I use 1920×1080 pixels by default, which is the 16:9 format and Full HD quality which is standard for most screens. The pixel aspect ratio is always set to square. For audio I select 48,000 Hz and under the video preview we can still set in which resolution we want to see the video in the program while editing. This does not affect our video in the end. At the very bottom you can save your settings as a default, where you can also write all the information into it, which you can also see in the presets on the right side.

For example, I saved a template that I use for all my YouTube videos or when I make story videos for my smartphone. At the bottom we can also give our sequence a name, which we will see in the project window after we have created it. At the top of the menu, we can now also specify how many audio and video tracks the sequence should have, but I personally always adjust this during the editing, because it’s easy there. Finally, we could also create VR videos, i.e. 360-degree videos, but we won’t discuss that in this basic course. When we clicked on OK, the sequence was created and now we see in the window: Editing, a timeline. The sequence is then also in our project window and can now be used like other videos and elements in other sequences.

You can create sequences that are exactly the same size as your loaded videos even easier by simply dragging a video to the Edit Window or to the Create New button. Then a sequence with the same name and the same settings of the video will be created.

Now it’s your turn. Why don’t you create a project, import all your video files into your Project Window. Finally create a sequence in Full-HD settings. Pause the basic course and try to apply what you’ve learned so far. Now I’ll show you how I would have done it. After I have started the program, I simply create a new project with the button and define a name and the location. Then I click on OK and drag all my files I want to use for editing into the project window. If they are all successfully loaded, I look through them all again and delete unnecessary clips and group them in folders. Then I create a new sequence where I use my YouTube template, here is an overview of all my settings When I clicked on OK I can theoretically start editing. If you want to do the same things as I did in this basic course, you can also download my Premiere-Pro project and all the clips as a template on simontutorial.de/premierepro and use them yourself.

The best Alternatives to Adobe Premiere Pro

Sony Vegas Pro

While Premiere Pro is a professional video editing solution, Adobe delivers a little brother that is a little leaner in its functional range. For example, the significantly cheaper version Premiere Elements offers less support in terms of file formats and performance, but still offers very good functions for amateur filmmakers.

The functionality is typical for Adobe with classic tools that are also known from Photoshop and Co. After a short period of getting used to it, one can already work very fast and precisely with Elements.
If you are unsure whether the range of functions is sufficient for you, Adobe offers you a free 30-day trial of the software. By the way, this applies to Premiere Pro as well as to Elements, so that nothing stands in the way of a direct comparison.

Sony Vegas as an alternative for Adobe Premiere Pro

Admittedly, Sony Vegas is more of a counterpart to Adobe AfterEffects thanks to the extensive effects options, but Sony Vegas also stands in a very good light in terms of editing technology and video editing. All in all, Vegas is a great all-rounder that brings a lot of functions under one roof.

  • Here you have the advantage of only having to purchase one program, and not several Adobe tools that can communicate with each other even without rendering, but all of which have their own price.
  • Sony Vegas also offers a 30-day trial version to familiarize yourself with how the program works.

The free professional alternative for Adobe Premiere Pro: Lightworks

With Lightworks, Hollywood blockbusters like “The Wolf Of Wallstreet” has already been created with it, and now you can work with the same professional software.

  • First of all: There is a little catch. The full range of functions is only available if you buy the full version. Otherwise you can export videos with a maximum resolution of 720p and MPEG4 codec.
  • However, if this is enough for you, you can still enjoy the full range of functions in the area of video editing and processing despite the free version. For the test version you only have to register at the manufacturer’s site.


Are you interestet in more hot tech deals? Subscribe to our Email-list and we let you know when the best deals come up.

Leave a Comment