5 Best Laptops With Fingerprint Readers in 2020

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Winner
Latest_Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, 15.6" FHD i7-9750H 32GB DDR4 512GB SSD PCIe NVIDIA Quadro T1000 4GB
Best Price
Lenovo 20NE0001US TS E495 3700U 8GB 256GB W10P
Dell Precision 5540 15.6" Mobile Workstation - Intel Core i7-9850H - 8GB RAM - 512GB SSD - Platinum Silver
ZBOOK 17 G6 I7/2.6 17 16GB 512GB W10P 64
Dell Latitude 14 7400 14" Notebook - Intel Core i7-8665U - 16GB RAM - 512GB SSD
Model
ThinkPad P1 Gen 2
E495
Precision 5540
ZBook 17 G6
Latitude 14 7400
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Excellent April 2020
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 9.1/10 Very Good April 2020
Test Result 8.7/10 Good April 2020
Test Result 8.6/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
Lenovo
Dell
HP
Dell
RAM
32GB
16 GB
8GB
16GB
16GB
CPU
i7-9850H
intel-9260ac
Intel Core i7-9850H
Intel Core i7-9850H
Intel Core i7-8665U
Graphics Card
NVIDIA Quadro T2000 4GB
Radeon RX Vega 10 Graphics
NVIDIA Quadro T2000 with 4GB
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000
Intel UHD Graphics 620
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
256GB SSD
512GB SSD
512GB SSD
512 SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.95 lbs
5.9 lbs
3.92 lbs
10.49 lbs
3 lbs
Pros
  • Great Performance
  • Silent fans
  • Awesome Screen
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Good Battery
  • Comfortable Keyboard
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Beautiful Display
  • Good Case
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Comfortable Keyboard
  • Secure Case
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Many Ports
  • Touchscreen
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Display a bit dark
  • Only 1 Thunderbolt-3 Port
  • Expensive
  • High weight
  • Display Brightness not Great
Winner
Latest_Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen 2, 15.6" FHD i7-9750H 32GB DDR4 512GB SSD PCIe NVIDIA Quadro T1000 4GB
Model
ThinkPad P1 Gen 2
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Excellent April 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
RAM
32GB
CPU
i7-9850H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA Quadro T2000 4GB
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.95 lbs
Pros
  • Great Performance
  • Silent fans
  • Awesome Screen
Cons
  • Expensive
Best Price
Lenovo 20NE0001US TS E495 3700U 8GB 256GB W10P
Model
E495
Test Result
Test Result 9.2/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
RAM
16 GB
CPU
intel-9260ac
Graphics Card
Radeon RX Vega 10 Graphics
Storage Capacity
256GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
5.9 lbs
Pros
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Good Battery
  • Comfortable Keyboard
Cons
  • Display a bit dark
Dell Precision 5540 15.6" Mobile Workstation - Intel Core i7-9850H - 8GB RAM - 512GB SSD - Platinum Silver
Model
Precision 5540
Test Result
Test Result 9.1/10 Very Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Dell
RAM
8GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-9850H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA Quadro T2000 with 4GB
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
3.92 lbs
Pros
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Beautiful Display
  • Good Case
Cons
  • Only 1 Thunderbolt-3 Port
ZBOOK 17 G6 I7/2.6 17 16GB 512GB W10P 64
Model
ZBook 17 G6
Test Result
Test Result 8.7/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
HP
RAM
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-9850H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000
Storage Capacity
512GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
10.49 lbs
Pros
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Comfortable Keyboard
  • Secure Case
Cons
  • Expensive
  • High weight
Dell Latitude 14 7400 14" Notebook - Intel Core i7-8665U - 16GB RAM - 512GB SSD
Model
Latitude 14 7400
Test Result
Test Result 8.6/10 Good April 2020
Manufacturer
Dell
RAM
16GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-8665U
Graphics Card
Intel UHD Graphics 620
Storage Capacity
512 SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
3 lbs
Pros
  • Fast Work Speed
  • Many Ports
  • Touchscreen
Cons
  • Display Brightness not Great

With Windows Hello, Microsoft has given its current Windows 10 system a comprehensive tool for biometric recognition. So you can log on to compatible laptops using face recognition. Also included: an internal system logon via fingerprint. This will bring you to the Windows desktop in no time at all. We’ll show you the Best Laptops with Fingerprint Sensor we tested in 2020.

Ranking First: Lenovo Thinkpad P1 Gen 2

Lenovo Thinkpad P1 Gen 2 review

Pros

  • Great Performance
  • Silent fans
  • Awesome Screen

Cons

  • Expensive

The case is typically for the Thinkpad series very well manufactured! The device is 2.3 cm thick at its highest point when closed. At the wrist-rest the height is 2 cm. The large touchpad first catches the eye when opened. The shiny black Thinkpad logo can be seen on the right of the wrist-rest. The fingerprint reader is located on the right side. The touchpad isn’t 100% centered. It’s 11.5 cm to the left side and 14.5 cm to the right. But this shouldn’t further disturb the function. What I noticed is that you can quickly see fingerprints on the case, the wrist-rest and the touchpad.

Keyboard and Trackpad

As with the predecessor and sister models, the P1 is also a 6-row precision keyboard without a number pad. The tested model has a backlight keyboard, which, as usual, can be controlled in two steps via the FN + space bar. Many keys have an additional LED installed, which indicates the function status.

The start button is not part of the keyboard, but is located above the “end” key in the bezel. A white LED indicates operation here. On the keyboard it can be typed very comfortably, just like on my previously tested T490s and T495s! It also differs only slightly from the outer construction of the predecessors, which are used in the T430 among others, so that one doesn’t have to get used to it. Another advantage is also the keyboard’s stroke. Even when you type very fast, it remains quiet. This is especially practical when the laptop is used by students in lectures or in the library, for example.

The trackpoint is, as can be expected from Lenovo, again very well implemented. The touchpad is, as already mentioned, 7 cm high and 10 cm wide and thus also leaves plenty of room for scrolling. It reliably recognizes normal and multi-touch inputs. Left clicks can either be executed by double tapping on the touchpad or in the lower left area. For the right click, only the press remains in the right area.

Display

A Full-HD HDR 400 IPS (1920 x 1080) 500 nits, 1200:1 contrast, 72% NTSC, viewing angle 170° display is built into the tested P1. The installed panel is an Innolux N156HCE-GN1! It has no touchscreen. It has strong colors and the viewing angle stability convinced me! At a conference with 5 people, all participants could still see the videos well from a semicircle. Since I couldn’t measure the brightness here either, I can only give a subjective opinion. This is: The Innolux N156HCE-GN1 comes across with good colors and contrasts. It was especially fun to edit videos on it. As far as the color display is concerned, I would now recommend the Innolux for graphics editing and / or video editing. It can compete with the AUO panels in any case and is in my opinion suitable for the above mentioned work. It has also passed the outdoor test. However, you should also avoid direct sunlight here, as the picture can then appear somewhat “milky”. For work in the shade (e.g. under the sunshade) it is suitable in any case!

Performance

An Intel Core i7-9750H HexaCore 2.6- 4.5 GHz, 12 MB SmartCache, 45W TDP and the NVIDIA® Quadro® T1000 4GB GDRR5 128bit is installed in the test device.

The P1 achieved an average of 1960 points in the test in mains operation with Cinebench R20. The highest measured value was 2095 points and the lowest value was 1825 points. Both tests were executed at full power. At the start of the application the clock rate was between 3.0 and 4.0 GHz. When video projects were rendered, all cores/threads ran at 2.4 GHz on average. The Nvidia has achieved 2102 points (35 FPS) in the graphics benchmark Geeks3D FurMark 2102 points (35 FPS). The graphics card gets the RAM (4 GB) from its own memory. So, you have enough buffer for graphic applications, CAD software and more demanding games with the Nvidia.

A 512 GB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD Opal2 M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD is built into the test device! The SSD should have enough space and also offer sufficient speed for many applications.

Fans

The P1 has two fans! One for the CPU and one for the Nvidia! Despite the P1’s performance, you can work passively cooled (i.e. silently) in office mode. However, if it’s required (e.g. the Cinebench test or video projects), you’ll notice the waste heat on the keyboard and above the keyboard more clearly. The whole top side along the keyboard probably also serves for heat dissipation. The CPU oscillates in balanced mode at about 9-10 watts, both in battery and mains operation. In these areas the fan is either not heard at all or only occasionally. However, if e.g. a video is rendered, the fan is clearly and loudly audible. See here a video with recording devices on the sides of the case.

Battery

According to the design, the battery is an 80Wh Li-io battery with up to 13 hours runtime and RapidCharge: 80% in 1 hour.

The adapter weighs 324 grams and supplies 135 watts for the P1. If you remember the “debris” from the W520/W530 era, you’ll find the adapter a “slim variant”.

Conclusion

At work I used the P1 with the software

  • Adobe Audition,
  • After Effects
  • Photoshop
  • Premiere

It’s an arithmetician who has more than fulfilled all my needs at work for me! I cut two big projects with the P1 (including 4K material) and it still had air up in the cut. Since my most modern Thinkpads are a W520 and T430 (Intel) in full development, there are worlds in between. Even in battery mode, the P1, adapted to the respective performance requirements, stood its ground in video editing. It can also work well outdoors or in bright offices in summer with the 500 nits. For example, I used the P1 in the field and edited a video there.

The battery displays 4:01 h in pure office mode (Word, Excel, read PDFs, surf) and fully charged. The consumption is ~9.7 Watt. For example, if videos are edited (no stretching), the display oscillates around 2 hours. In battery mode, a 1:30 minute video in rendering(which took 27 minutes) used up half of the battery.

Since I’m still studying on the side, I also have the laptop with me during the lectures. Here the factors space (size) and battery life are important. Computing power is rather less in demand due to the course of study. Thanks to its flat design, the P1 can be stored very well in a backpack / bag and doesn’t take up too much space. However, it takes up significantly more space in lectures and makes it difficult to use with a writing pad. After all, it is a 15.6 device! But if you write down your notes exclusively with the laptop, it fits on the student’s bench. But for my course of studies it is a clear overkill to use the P1 there! The maximum requirements are PDFs, internet research and watching videos! Nevertheless, with the appropriate battery setting, I was able to benefit from its runtime and work/play around 200 minutes actively on it.

The P1 is definitely a recommendation when it comes to performance, 4k videos, CAD applications or simply a long-term investment in a powerful laptop. Thus, programs that require a lot of CPU and GPU power can be used on the P1 without hesitation, which makes it the winner in our Ranking of the best Laptops with Fingerprint Scanner!

Ranking Second: Lenovo E495

Lenovo E495 review

Pros

  • Fast Work Speed
  • Good Battery
  • Comfortable Keyboard

Cons

  • Display a bit dark

The Thinkpad E495 comes – as far as not surprising – in a classic red-black combination. In true style, a red sticker was applied in the lower left corner this time, which fits much better than the previous blue one. A very pleasant move from Lenovo at this point.

The material of the case is completely made of plastic – the case itself is made of a matt, rough textured material while the lid uses a smoother, slightly shiny material. The classic rubber coating is unfortunately missing at this point.

The physical first impression is excellent – nothing creaks, squeaks or rattles. The lower shell is stiff and not very flexible at all points.

The long hinge, also in black, used at this point is not negatively noticeable – it can be opened with one hand, holds the last set position at all times and does not swing along even when typing in a sweeping manner.

Ports

Like almost all modern laptops, the Thinkpad E495 has only a limited number of ports or expansion options. Specifically, we have an HDMI port, two USB ports and the combined audio port on the left of the charging socket (USB-C).

A further USB port, the RJ45 network socket (full size), the Kensington lock and a slot for micro SD cards are additionally found on the right side.

Unfortunately, there are no connections at the front and back. A docking port is no longer available – the USB-C docking solution is accessed here.

Keyboard

Speaking of the case, the keyboard seems to have been taken one-to-one from the other Thinkpads. Unfortunately without keyboard illumination on this model – only a few keys have a status LED (CapsLock, ESC/FnLock and audio/micro lock key).

The typing feel on the chiclet keyboard is good, there is hardly any flex, the keys respond cleanly. Even fast typers shouldn’t have any problems here.

The trackpad also gives no reason for criticism. It is slightly rougher than on other devices and reacts reliably. The only downer here is that it takes almost a centimeter before it recognizes a finger reaching in from outside. This could be related to the trackpad’s lowering of about 1mm in relation to the case and makes it difficult to use wiping gestures. The clickability in the lower area is very good and smooth, in the upper area it is more difficult due to the lever movement.

The trackpoint with the dedicated buttons works wonderfully and as usual well.

Display

Speaking of the case, the keyboard seems to have been taken one-to-one from the other Thinkpads. Unfortunately without keyboard illumination on this model – only a few keys have a status LED (CapsLock, ESC/FnLock and audio/micro lock key).

The typing feel on the chiclet keyboard is good, there is hardly any flex, the keys respond cleanly. Even fast typers shouldn’t have any problems here.

The trackpad also gives no reason for criticism. It is slightly rougher than on other devices and reacts reliably. The only downer here is that it takes almost a centimeter before it recognizes a finger reaching in from outside. This could be related to the trackpad’s lowering of about 1mm in relation to the case and makes it difficult to use wiping gestures. The clickability in the lower area is very good and smooth, in the upper area it is more difficult due to the lever movement.

The trackpoint with the dedicated buttons works wonderfully and as usual well.

Now that we are very happy with the input to data – what about the output?

We have a 14 inch IPS display in 16:9 format with 1920×1080 pixels as a monitor. This shines with 250nits and is supposed to offer a contrast of 600:1 as well as a viewing angle of unusually low 170°.

Well – none of these numbers indicate an exceptional display. This is also the case in reality. The display is well suited for office environments – the minimum brightness can be set very low and the contrast remains bearable even at low levels. The illumination is even and the display does not invert even at strong angles. I couldn’t detect any flickering or beeping in dimmed mode.

It looks different if you plan to work outside – the display is simply too dark and the contrast isn’t high enough due to the slightly reflective surface.

The contrast and the color rendering itself is okay for medium requirements – compared to better displays it lacks some brilliance and color space. Compared to the older TN displays ala T410 (the older ones among us will still remember), the display is fantastic, though. I wouldn’t want to do image editing with higher demands, though.

The sound comes from the Thinkpad E495’s speakers on the bottom. This works well mixed depending on the surface. Unfortunately, the speakers tend to clatter at medium and high volume. The volume itself is comparatively high and is sufficient for sound reinforcement in an office area.

Display

Following the premise that maintenance flaps are a thing of the past, the E495 is also designed. After loosening a handful of screws, the one-piece lower shell can be removed in one piece with a lot of patience and caution, allowing a view of almost every serviceable part in the E495.

First positive impressions are the two available ram slots, of which only one is occupied with an 8GB bar. Upgrading to 2x8GB would be highly recommended here, as Ryzen CPUs benefit greatly from DualChannel. The 256GB NVMe-SSD from Hynik is located in one of the two M.2 slots (the second one is occupied by the WLAN card 9260 from Intel). Very kindly to the knowledge I also named the included 2.5 inch dummy. Here it is not necessary to buy a connection kit – an existing hard disk can be installed immediately.

All other parts including ventilation, battery and hinges are easily accessible. Therefore, it should never be necessary to remove the mainboard from the carrier (many greetings to HP…)

All in all a very good rating – apart from the lower shell with its sensitive plastic clips – as there are no soldered parts that make upgrading or conversion difficult.

Performance

Now that we have admired the exterior and found it good, we come to the most interesting part – the interior.

In contrast to the normal series, this E model has an AMD processor. This isn’t a novelty at Lenovo – there were already series with such processors – but recently AMD has done a lot right with the Ryzen series. Let’s see if this is also true for mobile processors. The E495 at hand has an AMD Ryzen 3500U processor which is supposed to clock nominally between 2.1-3.7 GHz – depending on the load, temperature and required number of cores. For this purpose it has 15 watts of TDP at its disposal.

Under observation, the Ryzen 3500U makes full use of its available capacity – in idle mode it clocks at 1.33 GHz – under load up to 3.72 GHz. This is basically also the case in battery operation – however, it seems to clock up less aggressively there, so that it comes to somewhat lower performance values.

The 3500U achieves a rating of 3418 points under PCMark10 for mains operation, 2728 points of which remain in battery mode. I’d like to take this opportunity to preface – DualChannel is worthwhile. The PCMark10 value increases with 2x8GB to a whole 3861 points – an increase of 13%.

As is well known, a fast processor also needs a powerful cooling system. As in all non-workstation models, this is somewhat limited by the size and in many cases limits the maximum performance of the processor. Fortunately, this is true in principle in this case, but there are no abstruse throttle orgies ala 800 MHz.

Basically about the cooling system: The fan moves between 0 rpm and about 60°C (therefore mostly passive cooling is possible), then starts with audible 3300 rpm and increases to a maximum of 4700 rpm (clearly audible). This number of revolutions is seldom reached with computationally intensive tasks or graphics-intensive processes – but it can be reached with continuous use like rendering or similar.

At about 80°C the processor starts to reduce its clock speed, it hasn’t reached more than 84°C for me. At this temperature it keeps a permanent clock rate of 2900-3050MHz on all cores even for longer periods (h264/h265 encoding in handbrake). Since I currently have 30°C room temperature, higher clock rates are certainly possible at more appropriate temperatures. Since the exhaust air is led away downward, a “jacking up” would be possibly helpful.

Wasn’t there still something – oh yes – the coffee. As you can see – 84°C hot it would be possible – a sufficient drinking temperature. Nevertheless, brewing at these temperatures will not be good – here you should rather use Intel processors, because they can reach up to 100°C. In regular operation, however, the coffee only gets lukewarm – 44-56°C. Therefore the E495 is unfortunately not suitable for making coffee – but it is suitable for keeping it warm.

The Lenovo E495 has only the smallest expansion stage of the Vega graphics card – the Vega 8. Nevertheless, for a graphics card integrated in the processor, this makes a very good picture – literally.

It places itself in a position far ahead of the Intel 620 – even the MX150 from the T480s (3551 points) has to admit defeat. However, the MX150 from the T480s can profit from the increased cooling performance and stays ahead with 4300 points. Nevertheless, both are dedicated graphics cards with all advantages and disadvantages. If you want more performance from the integrated graphics card, you’ll find it in the Vega 10.

It’s enough for a game in between – it can’t manage the newest titles or full details in FullHD. But the performance is more than remarkable for an office notebook. It should be noted that the Vega 8 only reaches its full performance in Dual Channel mode – after all, 23% more performance. In my eyes, the second 8GB bar is a mandatory purchase.

Battery

The integrated battery holds 45Wh and can be replaced with a little skill – but not on the road. In contrast to the T-models, there is no external battery, so that the built-in battery remains the only energy source.

With lowest brightness, an open browser and various windows without load, Windows attests the E495 11 hours and 10 minutes battery life (CPU Package Power 0.73W). This value drops to under 90 minutes under full load (11.1W package power, 3.12 GHz on all cores). Realistic is 5-7 hours at changing load.

Conclusion

Would I recommend the E495? Absolutely. The Ryzen 3500U is very well positioned against the Intel competition, the battery life is comparable. The cooling system manages the performance easily – the base clock of 2.1 GHz is always clearly exceeded. The graphics plays in the league of dedicated graphics cards – what more could you want?

You have to make concessions in terms of equipment (SSD, rubberized lid) – in return, the E495 shines in terms of expandability (apart from the missing LTE) like the second Ram bar. The workmanship is impeccable and the materials are appropriate to the price. Overall, a clear recommendation to buy our Best Price in the Ranking of the best Laptops with Fingerprint Scanner.

Ranking Third: Dell Precision 5540

Dell Precision 5540 review

Pros

  • Fast Work Speed
  • Beautiful Display
  • Good Case

Cons

  • Only 1 Thunderbolt-3 Port

Professionally mobile. The Dell Precision 5540 is the workstation version of the Dell XPS 15. Besides an almost identical exterior, it’s mainly the components built in the interior that make the difference.

The “case of the XPS series, which has already been in use for several generations, is so well done that Dell not only uses it for years, but also across all classes. As the Dell Precision 5540, it should meet the demands of professional users and primarily provides sufficient selectivity with Nvidia Quadro graphics. Additionally, an Intel Xeon CPU is also available, which is supposed to provide for increased reliability in continuous load scenarios.

Possible competitors with a similar orientation are for example the Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen.2, the HP ZBook Studio G5, the HP ZBook 15v or Apple’s 15″ MacBook Pro.

Design

The case of the Dell Precision 5540 is perfectly manufactured, offers a high torsional stiffness and creates an overall very good quality impression. Although no aluminum unibody case is used here, Dell manages to put an extremely appealing case construction on its feet with a combination of metal, plastic and carbon fiber composite. The test weight with a 97 Wh battery is a moderate 4.4 lbs and can be described as pleasantly light in a workstation comparison. For example, the Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Gen.2 with a weight of 3.7 lbs turns out even lighter with a comparable case quality, which then only has an 80 Wh battery integrated.

In order to be able to open the case of the Dell Precision 5540, you have to remove the entire base plate. The Dell-XPS-15 case hasn’t always had a separate maintenance lid. How one proceeds best in order to access, exchange or insert the different components, one should still orientate oneself at the moment on the service manual of the Dell Precision 5530 as a stopgap: Dell Precision 5530 Service Manual. An update for the Precision 5540 is not available on Dell’s support pages at the time of testing.

Ports

Dell obviously hasn’t changed anything in the interface equipment since the Dell Precision 5510. A single Thunderbolt 3 port should, as already in the Dell Precision 5530, turn out a bit tight in the professional field. Dell could have easily replaced one of the two USB type-A ports with a second Thunderbolt 3.

Thanks to HDMI 2.0, external UHD displays can also be operated with a refresh rate of 60 Hz via the Thunderbolt 3’s integrated DisplayPort. The memory card reader does not slow down fast UHS-II cards.

The interface performance of the Dell Precision 5540 turns out very good, as already in the predecessor. Data can be transferred with up to 423 MB/s via USB 3.0 and up to 268 MB/s via memory card reader.

In order to be able to exhaust the Thunderbolt 3’s performance, there are now a number of powerful and quite affordable mass storage devices available. Samsung’s Portable SSD X5, for example, achieves up to 2,151 MB/s when reading and 595 MB/s when writing.

Fingerprint Scanner

Like the Dell Precision 5530, the Dell Precision 5540 is equipped with a fingerprint reader. This is integrated in the on/off button and is easily accessible. Dell generally doesn’t offer a smartcard reader for the series. Otherwise, the usual password backups at BIOS and system level can be optionally supplemented by various Computrace services or Opal-compliant solid state drives. A Trusted Platform Module is always on board. A Noble cable lock preparation is available for physical security.

Sound

The stereo speakers integrated on the lower front side deliver a fairly balanced sound characteristic. Basses are present and mids are easy to hear. A certain treble load cannot really be denied even with this solution. The maximum volume of 78.5 dB(A) turns out comparatively low, but doesn’t distort either.

External speaker solutions can be connected most easily via USB or Bluetooth, thus increasing range and quality during presentations or video evenings. The 3.5 mm jack connector is located on the left side of the housing and combines the headphone output with the microphone input.

Keyboard and Touchpad

The keyboard of the Dell Precision 5540 does without a separate number pad despite the large 15-inch case. Number jugglers won’t like this, but it provides for a harmonious appearance with a centrally positioned touchpad. The keys are arranged in a 19 mm grid and thus have a normal size.

Merely the arrow keys look somewhat compressed as usual. Especially the vertical direction could have been a bit more luxurious. You don’t have to fear any surprises in terms of key assignment. The lettering is high-contrast and can be enhanced by the two-stage keyboard illumination if necessary.

The keyboard’s quality leaves a very good impression in typing mode. The fairly short stroke offers a good pressure point, a pleasantly quiet stroke noise and profits from the firmly lying keyboard mat. Nothing teeters here.

Although the touchpad doesn’t reach the enormous size of a 15-inch MacBook Pro, it still offers quite generous space with an input area of 105 x 80 mm. Multiple finger gestures are reliably accepted, as well as simpler input. The gliding characteristics are very good and the haptics are pleasant. The mouse keys integrated in the touchpad work perfectly and don’t give cause for negative criticism. However, you have to do without a trackpoint in the Dell Precision 5540.

Display

The UHD OLED display used in the test device comes with a smooth display surface with Dell Precision 5540, but has a respectably functioning anti-reflective coating. It is able to noticeably reduce occurring reflections in comparison to many a competitor. Nevertheless, you have to reckon with certain restrictions here, which have a disturbing effect depending on screen orientation and prevailing light conditions.

Finger operation is not possible with the OLED variant. If you value this input option, you must use the UHD IGZO4 display as an alternative.
The panel used in the test device comes from Samsung and pleases with an overall very good viewing angle stability. The maximum brightness reaches 436 cd/m² in the regular test sequence with screen filling white in the center of the screen. Since OLEDs can adapt the power consumption and brightness locally to the requirements, up to 534 cd/m² were achieved in the test with small white areas.

From a metrological point of view, the illumination of full-screen white tends to reach an average of 86%. In contrast, no differences can be seen in the black image, as the OLEDs do not emit any light here. Black image content is thus shown without brightening, cloud formation or halos at the edges of the display. Depending on the viewing angle from the side or from above, a greenish-red color shimmer appears in bright image content. This isn’t annoying, but especially sensitive screen users should consider this.

As usual, the brightness can be adjusted as a percentage in 11 levels or in the display settings. Level 6 provides a brightness of 147 cd/m² and level 7 205 cd/m² (both display center, full white). The panel is quite suitable for outdoor use due to its high luminance, excellent contrast and the bluish-green anti-reflective coating. However, direct sunlight or unfavorable viewing angles should also be avoided here.

Performance

With a permanently sustained processor load, the performance development is very constant despite the compact housing dimensions and the thus not optimal cooling conditions. With a stable 23,600 points, all Intel processors tested so far are clearly outdone. Only AMD’s Ryzen 7 1700 profits from the better cooling conditions in the Asus ROG Strix GL702ZC and barely stays ahead in this scenario.

Dell puts the emphasis on the highest possible graphics performance under simultaneous CPU and GPU load. Whilst the Nvidia Quadro T2000 runs here with a core clock rate of 1.5 to 1.54 GHz, the processor clock rate oscillates between 1.8 GHz and 2.1 GHz. The average CPU geeking result is reduced to about 13,000 points in this full load scenario and thus loses a good 10,000 points.

The essential core element of a mobile workstation is the graphics unit designed for professional tasks. Special drivers with OpenGL optimizations, an adapted BIOS and modified hardware are used here. In comparison to the usual consumer graphics units of the Geforce and Radeon series, the professional graphics chips should show their advantages especially in continuous load operation and in OpenGL-optimized professional applications from the CAD sector.

The Quadro T2000 of the Turing family with 4 GB GDDR5 graphics memory is used in the tested Dell Precision 5540. It works together with the integrated Intel UHD Graphics 630 in the Nvidia Optimus network. By switching between the graphics chips, either the powerful professional graphics or the particularly economical processor graphics are available. In mobile use this is especially beneficial for the battery life.

The Nvidia Quadro T2000 is intended for use in 15 inch notebooks or larger. It has 1,024 shader units, is equipped with 4 GB GDDR5 graphics memory (Micron) and achieves a clock rate of up to 1,605 MHz in the test device. According to Nvidia, the power consumption may be in the range between 40 watts and 60 watts.

Battery

The tester is configured with the large 97-Wh battery, which is mandatory for configurations with OLED panels. This then fills the available space in the housing to such an extent that there is no more room for a 2.5-inch mass memory. If, on the other hand, one does without the OLED panel, the Dell Precision 5540 can also be configured with a 56 Wh battery and 2.5 inch drive.

The test device achieves good battery runtimes under practical conditions thanks to the ample battery capacity. The PCMark 8 battery test (205 cd/m², balanced profile, wireless on) only ends after 3:56 hours and the PCMark 10 Modern Office Battery Test runs for 9:07 hours. The 130 watt adapter needs 164 minutes to charge the battery.

The performance in battery mode turns out very good in the Dell Precision 5540. In the tested scenarios, over 90% of the actual performance is always available in mains operation. This is then at the expense of the achievable battery life, but provides for an excellent performance in computationally intensive jobs.

Conclusion

The mobile workstation Dell Precision 5540 also manages to raise the bar a bit higher in the current model year. The improvements that come with this clearly distinguish the Precision 5540 from its predecessor and should be a not inconsiderable incentive for a possible upgrade.

These include above all the performance, display quality and noise emissions. The webcam, finally positioned in the upper display frame again, is also a welcome innovation. The case and manufacturing quality, the interface equipment, the configuration options and the input devices have remained on a high level.

Smaller construction sites, like the missing WWAN option or a second Thunderbolt 3 port, can certainly be overcome in most cases. Whether this also applies to the, even after profiling, not quite perfect color fidelity and the somewhat too weakly dimensioned power supply, might depend strongly on the intended field of application and personal demands.

Dell Precision 5540 The bottom line is that the Dell Precision 5540 workstation pleases very well again and should convince many interested users of its successful features.

Ranking Fourth: HP ZBOOK 17 G6

HP ZBOOK 17 review

Pros

  • Fast Work Speed
  • Comfortable Keyboard
  • Secure Case

Cons

  • High weight

The ZBook 17 G6 from HP ended up in fourth place in the comparison test. As the name already reveals, the notebook, which weighs almost 7.2 lbs, has a 17 inch display, which however only provides a Full-HD resolution.

The brightness is only average at 339 cd/m2 and unfortunately it drops off quite strongly at the edges, so on balance there are better displays than this one.

In return, both the excellent keyboard and the workmanship are among the notebook’s strengths. Nothing wobbles here and everything looks robust and durable.

If you open the maintenance flap on the underside of the case, you’ll see a lot of free space, which is intended for easy retrofitting with an SSD or additional RAM.

While the ZBook weakened a bit on the display, it was convincing in terms of performance. The much cheaper ZBook couldn’t come close to the P1, but the notebook was always ahead in the chasing pack.

The good rendering value is especially striking here and the device was also very fast in image editing. Last but not least, the ZBook took first place in the gaming benchmark, which should please the gaming fans among the serious screen workers.

As a special extra, our test device, which is ISV-certified for most applications, was equipped with an NFC chip.

Conclusion

The ZBook convinces with performance and a good battery life. The installation of additional hardware is no problem thanks to the maintenance flap. Although behind the other three devices, the ZBook from HP is a good business Laptop with a fingerprint scanner, meaning I would definitely recommend it!

Ranking Fifth: Dell Latitude 14 7400

Dell Latitude 14 7400 review

Pros

  • Fast Work Speed
  • Many Ports
  • Touchscreen

Cons

  • Display Brightness not Great

Unlike the XPS series, for example, which are aimed at private and business user is directed, the Latitude 7400 2-in-1 completely to the needs of business users. This can be seen, among other things, that there’s a service hatch and components such as the SSD replacement because they not soldered, but plugged in will be. In addition, an extended support and service offer and additional security features. In this context the Latitude 7400 2-in-1 is a fully special, comfortable delicacy with: Complementary to TPM module, Noble lock slot and various security software, the Business-Convertible for the first time over a proximity sensor. This blocks access to the computer automatically, if its owner is and reports him with Help of face recognition as well automatically restarts when it is connected to the device returns – without he enters the password or the …for fingerprints.

Also on the subject of productivity the latitude moves on the Time exposure: Great input devices, a total of four fast USB ports, two with Thunderbolt 3 support, various Docking options and a built-in LTE modem facilitate the Work in the office and on the road. In addition, the ultra-slim business bolides also at the longest business trip hardly the juice runs out: Because with typical Office tasks are held by the battery for almost 15 hours. Although our test device “only” equipped with a Core i5 processor it’s in the test category System performance the full score on.

And since the noble convertible is also not naked in terms of design and quality of workmanship, towers above the versatile mobile computer in the end the brand colleagues XP13 at the top of the connect best list – although the device is at least in the tested configuration recklessly points: This is how the SSD only a modest 256 GB, even the display brightness allows for something wishes left, and an active Pen is only available for an additional charge. Nevertheless the Latitude 7400 2-in-1 from us a clear recommendation to buy – if the respective budget, explicitly also for Home user.

How to Activate Fingerprint sensor in Windows Hello

Of course, business notebook users will now say “Unlock by fingerprint? It’s been around forever!”. That’s true, of course: My first Thinkpad had a fingerprint sensor more than ten years ago, which not only secured Windows, but also the entire laptop if desired. But with Windows Hello, Microsoft has officially integrated the feature into the system, so there’s no need for third-party software. On the Xiaomi Notebook Air (read more about the device here), where I use Windows Hello in this tutorial, the system works much better than anything I’ve tried so far.

Maybe I’m just missing recent comparisons, but: If your laptop is Hello-ready, you should definitely try it. Information about Windows Hello and which devices are already supported can be found on the Microsoft homepage. By the way, you can also upgrade your Windows Hello compatibility: Appropriate devices bring the comfort functions to your desktop PC via USB connection.

And this is how you activate Windows Hello on your Windows 10 PC:

  • First open the Windows 10 settings via the Start menu. Here you navigate to Accounts and switch to the submenu Login Options.
  • If your PC or laptop meets the requirements for Windows Hello, you can start with a click on Setup under Fingerprint. Before Windows accepts your fingerprint, you will need to enter the current PIN code or password for your Windows installation.
  • Windows 10 now asks you to set up the fingerprint. With this fingerprint you will be able to log in to the operating system in no time. Just follow the instructions on the screen to register your fingerprint. Depending on the hardware you use, it may take a little patience, but in my experience, the recognition works without any problems in practice.
  • If Windows 10 is satisfied with your finger, you still have the option to enroll more fingers for enrollment. When you’re done, you can now simply log in to your Windows installation by “Laying Finger”. Alternatively, you can always log in using the traditional password or PIN. By the way: Of course you can also choose to log in completely automatically. This tutorial will show you how to do this.

What do you think about Windows Hello? A fine feature or do you get gasping at the thought of entrusting your fingerprint to Windows 10? I look forward to comments and discussions.


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