Review: AMD Ryzen 5 3600x vs Ryzen 7 3800X (2020)

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Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
  • No integrated graphics
Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics

Test Result: AMD Ryzen 5 3600x vs Ryzen 7 3800X

AMD’s portfolio of Ryzen 3000 processors includes only five models.

However, as the test of the Ryzen 5 3600X and Ryzen 7 3800X shows, while they are logical additions on paper, they are almost irrelevant in everyday life.

The smaller counterparts are the far better complete package.

Of the five new Matisse processors from the AMD Ryzen 3000 family, two were still missing in the big Ryzen 3000 test.

These were not available as samples from the manufacturer, and even retailers could hardly get hold of models in the case of the Ryzen 7 3800X.

And this is no coincidence: Together with the Ryzen 5 3600X, this is a gap-filler, both of which hardly have a right to exist, as the test process showed.

But without the models, the portfolio would be very thin and the price jumps huge.

AMD is therefore in a quandary. Techtestreport tests and shows why this is so.

Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
  • No integrated graphics
Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics

Ryzen 5 3600X and Ryzen 7 3800X in detail

The Ryzen 5 3600X is the big brother of the Ryzen 5 3600, raising its TDP by 30 watts from 65 to 95 watts, but allowing it to clock slightly higher – 200 MHz in both base and turbo.

This comes at a price: 50 Dollars extra is to be paid for it, a surcharge of around 25 percent.

For the Ryzen 7 3800X, the surcharge to the completely identically equipped Ryzen 7 3700X is even greater:

80 Dollars both in the RRP and in the shops. In return, the basic clock rate increases by 300 MHz, which is due to the 40 percent higher TDP, but in turbo mode both models ultimately separate by only 100 MHz.

Everyday operation is based on the turbo and rarely on the base, so that the differences in the end will be less than can be seen on paper.

It’s also interesting to see almost three weeks after the launch, how much AMD admonished the dealers not to deviate from the EIA.

This development has been seen more and more in recent months and years – a kind of price guarantee for the first four weeks after the launch, before retailers are allowed to “fight” each other again.

This is not only true for AMD CPUs, as this is also the case with Nvidia’s super graphics cards.

But a neutral look at the portfolio still shows a problem for AMD.

The three models 3600, 3700X and 3900X may be enough in the end customer business, but the price gaps between them would be far too big.

Therefore, more CPUs are needed, which are positioned in between.

And the big competitor, Intel, is known to lead the way: There are various Core i5 in the smallest price range – but these many models aren’t really needed.

But in the OEM business they can always be placed somewhere.

AMD’s naming will remain partially opaque in 2020

Since the first Ryzen from AMD there were some constants in the names of the processors: Without letters, they were 65-watt models.

An X was added to the name to make a 95 watt model (and more).

But the portfolio of CPUs quickly became very large, especially in the first generation, and in some areas it was already too much of a good thing.

This was rationalized away in the second generation – a completely correct decision.

The third generation starts with even fewer models, but even the five CPUs are still too similar today.

And then there is the naming, which is no longer meaningful. If the Ryzen 5 3600 and 3600X models are still clean with the same number of cores, but with a slightly lower clock rate at 65 watts or a slightly higher rate at 95 watts, the Ryzen 7 3700X is already out of the ordinary.

This should actually be a 95 watt model in name, but it only has 65 watts.

Instead, there is a Ryzen 7 3800X with exactly the same equipment in the higher TDP class with a little more clock.

In order to have a real comparison with the predecessor, these models should simply have been named 3700 and 3700X – as in Gen 1 and Gen 2.

Then AMD would also have had less problems in naming CPUs with more equipment.

So the company runs straight into the 3900 series and has to put up two models there, whose differences are so much greater than when jumping from 3700X to 3800X:

Ryzen 9 3900X with 12 cores and Ryzen 9 3950X with 16 cores. In the end, none of this is logical and therefore incomprehensible (not only) for laymen, but it is a tradition at AMD.

Benchmarks, power consumption and temperatures

The new test system introduced with Ryzen 3000 is used to test the two missing processors.

As always, all the CPUs work according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

A new beta BIOS was deliberately not installed to show the differences on an identical platform.

In any case, some of the last BIOS variants still have errors.

Benchmarks in applications

In the first series of tests around modern applications for desktop PCs, the minimal clock differences of the two processor models from AMD compared to the smaller representatives also show a small performance gain.

The Ryzen 5 3600X can thus place itself 4 percent ahead of the Ryzen 5 3600, both for multi-core and single-core apps.

The Ryzen 7 3800X, on the other hand, gains only up to 3 percent over the 3700X; in single-core operation the whole thing even shrinks to 1 percent.

100 MHz at a 4.5 GHz clock rate is virtually only a difference on paper, but no longer in the real world.

A look at the details shows that the Ryzen 7 3800X is often even on par with the Ryzen 7 3700X, the biggest exception being a 6 percent lead in the corona benchmark and in handbrake.

This poses a massive problem for the 3800X, because customers are supposed to pay 80 Dollars or 23 percent more for it. It’s a bill that doesn’t add up.

Benchmarks in games (Full HD and UHD)

In games it traditionally lies at two points: More cores are good, and the clock should also be around 4 GHz.

All other parameters become secondary – and these include 100 to 200 MHz more clock speed, which is known to distinguish the X models from the smaller versions.

This is exactly what the benchmarks show, the Ryzen 5 3600X delivers the same performance as the cheaper Ryzen 5 3600, while the Ryzen 7 3800X cannot be distinguished from the cheaper Ryzen 7 3700X.

Therefore, they are not a better choice for games, the grip can be easily adjusted to the smaller model.

The power consumption matches the TDP and the other CPUs

The triad of power consumption including temperature measurement as well as the consideration of how efficiency compares to the previous representatives goes almost hand in hand with the findings in benchmarks.

In idle mode, all five new AMD representatives are almost on a par, which is primarily due to the platform.

The X570 mainboards are all no cost disdainers, older boards can quickly be ten watts and more below.

If it goes into the load ranges, it becomes once again clear how good the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is.

The smaller six-core Ryzen 5 3600X almost always uses the same amount of energy as the eight-core processor for significantly less power in the overall package.

Compared to the Ryzen 5 3600, the leap of the X model is also significant, with a touch of extra performance in benchmarks sometimes using significantly more energy.

The bottom line is that the Ryzen 5 3600X is the worst model in the new Matisse family in terms of performance per watt.

The Ryzen 7 3800X clearly stands out in the AVX test under maximum load with Prime95.

But even the high value still meets AMD’s requirements, because according to the specification, a 105 watt processor is allowed up to 142 watts – the model operates exactly at this limit.

The quality of the twelve-core seems to be in a completely different league, though, and the same applies to the 65 watt models.

The 3600X and the 3800X both seem to be the CPUs that barely managed to binning, which is why they were denied the service as an efficient and power-saving model and only the “residual ramp” remained at around 100 watts.

The “small” 100 watt CPUs get very warm

At Computex 2020, a motherboard manufacturer told Techtestreport for the first time that the new Ryzen 3000 will be very hot.

Further explanations were not forthcoming at the time, but after testing the first eight- and twelve-core processors in early July, this picture could not be confirmed.

But a look at the Ryzen 5 3000 and the second Ryzen 7 changed this.

And it also becomes clear why the warning of the motherboard manufacturers came:

They only got these models at the beginning as engineering samples from AMD and promptly left the impression.

In the meantime, it has been confirmed what the manufacturers said at the time:

Especially the 100-watt versions of the Ryzen 3000 processors get very warm.

And not only in the editorial office, because the Techtestreport community has already had this unpleasant experience.

The Ryzen 5 3600X seems to be such a model, which is almost a little bit on the clock with the crowbar by high TDP, but consequently produces very high temperatures without any real extra power compared to the Ryzen 5 3600.

The Ryzen 7 3800X is even higher than that, already in the Cinebench test it is fast with 85 degrees, at the maximum it is even higher.

But here, as with all Intel CPUs, the following applies: theoretically, all of this is no problem; all models can handle it according to the specifications.

The high power consumption also affects possible overclocking attempts.

Just under 4.3 GHz were possible, but the 100 degrees were quickly reached.

In the end, this is 50 to 100 MHz more than was achieved with the Ryzen 7 3700X.

And so it remains the same interim conclusion:

The Ryzen 3000, with its very high performance and high efficiency, is simply in a better position in factory condition, and overclocking is not very desirable.

However, a curiosity could also be observed in the Intel Core i7-9700 used for comparison.

Without any real limits, this 65 Watt CPU consumes extremely much and therefore becomes clearly too warm.

The procedure was not only to be found on one mainboard, but on four copies from different manufacturers and with different chipset.

There seems to be a bug in deeper BIOS or even microcode regions. However, if the CPU is set within its fixed limits, the result is completely correct.

Final Verdict: AMD Ryzen 5 3600x vs Ryzen 7 3800X

Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
  • No integrated graphics
Performance Winner
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 7 3800X
Test Result
Test Result 9.8/10 Excellent June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
8 cores (3.6 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q3/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-3200 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Beats Intel Core i5-9600K in applications, almost matches 8700K and 10600K
  • Gaming performance significantly improved, 10% over the previous generation
  • Best price-performance ratio
Cons
  • No integrated graphics
Best Price-Performance Ratio (for Gaming)
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6-Core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Spire Cooler
Model
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X
Test Result
Test Result 9.6/10 Very Good June 2020
Manufacturer
AMD
Performance category
Mid-range CPU segment
Cores
6 cores (3.8 GHz up to 4.4 GHz Max Turbo )
Performance for Gaming
Workstation (Applications) Performance
Overclocking possible?
Hyperthreading possible?
First release date
Q4/2019
Max. RAM
DDR4-2666 up to 128GB
Pros
  • Top-notch gaming frame rates for a midrange processor
  • Good thermal performance
  • 6 cores
Cons
  • No integrated graphics

An honest verdict: Ryzen 5 3600X and Ryzen 7 3800X are two processors that offer great performance.

They are by no means bad CPUs, since they still keep many Intel opponents in check.

They outperform the larger models in almost every respect. Except for the performance, because the two offer a little more of that, with significantly higher power consumption.

Exactly for this reason they will find some buyers.

At the end of the complete series of tests with all AMD Ryzen 3000 and a lot of experience gained in the past four weeks, the recommendation from the first Ryzen 3000 test is now complete:

Those who buy budget-oriented will choose the AMD Ryzen 5 3600X. The already upper middle class is covered extremely well by the AMD Ryzen 7 3800X with eight cores and thus also a certain future-proofing, which the Techtestreport editorial staff likes best of all CPUs in the new series.

The AMD Ryzen 9 3900X is the first 12-core solution in this market environment that can stand up to any small workstation processor and is uniquely positioned for applications.

Gaming PC Build: How to chose the right CPU

If you want to assemble a gamer PC, you have to deal with the question of the suitable CPU at an early stage.

The processor is a central component of your gaming PC and, in combination with the graphics card, forms the performance backbone of your system.

The processor takes over all computing operations that are not performed by the CPU of the graphics card (=GPU, Graphics Processing Unit).

There are actually only two manufacturers in the gaming PC sector worth mentioning when it comes to the processor that are suitable for installation: AMD and Intel.

These two manufacturers have been running head to head for years, who builds the best and most powerful processors and as so often, the decision whether it should be an AMD processor or an Intel processor is a question of faith and of course also a question of budget.

For a long time it was the case that Intel built the more powerful processors while AMD was able to score especially in terms of price.

But at the latest with the release of the RYZEN processor series based on the Zen architecture in 2017, AMD will be on par with Intel again in terms of absolute processor performance, so that a differentiated debate should take place regarding the choice of processor.

It is no longer as easy as before to decide whether an Intel or an AMD processor is the better choice.

The current status of processors – AMD RYZEN and Intel Core i

As far as product policy is concerned, AMD and Intel have very similar approaches.

Both manufacturers offer processors for the consumer sector in different performance classes and market these specifically as entry-level, mid-range and high-end processors.

At AMD these 4 performance classes are called RYZEN 3 (entry level), RYZEN 5 (mid-range) and RYZEN 7 (high-end).

The absolute high-end processor class at AMD is the RYZEN Threadripper line, which is intended for absolute hardware enthusiasts and is correspondingly expensive but also powerful.

INTEL is also positioned analogously: Within the CORE i series, Intel also offers 4 performance classes, namely the Intel Core i3 (entry level), Core i5 (mid-range) and Core i7 (high-end) processors.

What is the Threadripper range at AMD, is the Core i9 range at Intel, which is also aimed at real performance enthusiasts.

What determines the performance of CPUs?

Whether Intel or AMD CPU, all processors have one thing in common:

Their performance is essentially defined by the number of computing cores (currently typically 4, 6 or 8 and more cores in the gaming sector) and the clock speed (computing operations per second) with which the computing cores operate.

Put simply, this means that the more computing cores a processor has and the higher the clock speed of these cores, the more powerful it is.

Computing cores, threads and multithreading

It is now the case that even the entry-level models (Ryzen 3 or Core i3) have four computing cores and many six-core processors are already to be found in the middle class.

In the high-end segment, there are even models with 14 cores and more, whereby the concrete benefit or the price/performance ratio should be rather uninteresting for most users.

However, less than 4 cores are no longer up to date for a gaming PC, which is why you should only consider doing without them if your budget is extremely tight!

The processor manufacturers have also found a way to let a processor core work on different “tasks” at the same time with a concept called “Mutlithreading”.

If this is the case, it is said that a single core can process several “threads” simultaneously.

This can increase the performance of the processors, since minimal pauses while processing one task A can be used to process another task B.

The utilization of the processors is increased by this concept and thus the arithmetic operations per time unit are increased.

Virtually all modern CPUs in the Core i and RYZEN series now support multithreading.

Studying processor benchmarks is a must

Ultimately, however, all theoretical information about clock, cores, cache sizes, etc. is of no interest unless you have studied information about the real achievable performance of the processor in practice!

Often, processors with similar specifications on paper perform surprisingly differently in different disciplines.

Some processor models show superior performance in gaming, while they drop out in “traditional” applications and vice versa.

It should therefore always be your goal to find out which specific processor model performs how well in the disciplines relevant to you.

Of course, it is not only the absolute performance that is decisive, but also the price-performance ratio.

If you (like most people) do not have an unlimited gaming PC budget, you should always look at the price-performance aspect.

Is it worth 5% more performance at a 50% higher price of the processor?

In order to get an overview of the practical performance of processors, you should definitely take a look at the many available benchmark lists of the major hardware portals (e.g. at Techtestreport or PC Games Hardware).

With the help of these overviews you can quickly see which processor performs how well in comparison to the current leader or comparable models.

As soon as you have classified yourself or your needs in a “performance class”, you can go one step further and check how much performance you get per Dollar with which processor.

CPU Generations – It goes on and on

Before buying your CPU, you should first of all find out which CPU generation of the respective manufacturer is current.

Within the Core i series from Intel, for example, 8(!) processor generations have been released in the meantime, which of course have developed very strongly over time.

A Core i5 processor of the first generation, for example, has very little to do with a Core i5 processor of the 8th generation.

Each new processor generation is more powerful and usually also more energy efficient.

It is also often the case that two generations are still available on the market in parallel for a long time.

So when a new processor generation sees the light of day, processors of the previous generation are often still available for a long time and are only gradually sold out of the dealers’ stocks.

You can take advantage of this fact! Depending on your personal performance requirements, you can save money if you choose a processor of the penultimate generation.

Typically, processor prices fall when a manufacturer – whether AMD or Intel – announces a new processor generation, because hardware dealers naturally want to free up their stocks so that they can stock up on the latest generation.

As a consumer, you can benefit from this and make real bargains on parts.

It is advisable to consider at this point whether the new generation is so powerful that its higher price is justified.

Most of the time, the performance improvements are not so great that you have to resort to the very latest generation.

Basically, the newer a processor generation is, the more powerful it is.

This is the reason why new processors are constantly being developed in new manufacturing processes.

Not all changes are necessarily directly noticeable for you as a gamer, but in general you can say: newer = better.

Not only processors develop further

It is also important to consider that new generations of processors often place new demands on the mainboard or socket and chipset.

Usually two successive generations of processors can be operated with one socket, but regularly the development comes to a point where an old “platform” (i.e. essentially socket and chipset) has to be replaced by new solutions to meet the increased requirements.

When deciding for or against a specific processor model, always consider the question whether the platform required (i.e. mainboard with socket and chipset) meets your requirements or fits into your budget!

The CPU and the mainboard socket

Once you have chosen a CPU that best suits your needs and budget, you are already setting restrictions on your motherboard.

Because as described above, each CPU only fits mechanically on a certain socket.

The socket is the mounting device of the CPU on the motherboard and it defines the shape and the (PIN) arrangement that a processor must have in order to be used.

Therefore, when choosing your mainboard, make sure (we’ll talk about this in detail later) that CPU and mainboard fit together.

Overclocking CPUs

Intel also offers overclocking models of its CPUs.

These can usually be recognized by an additional designation of the model, for example the additional letter “K” (i7-4770K).

In these processor models the clock is not locked, so that the system can be overclocked with an appropriate overclocking mainboard.

It is advisable to consider in advance whether or not to take overclocking measures sooner or later, because some other hardware decisions depend on it (primarily mainboard, CPU cooler).

In addition, overclocking models usually cost a few Dollars more – money you can save if you don’t want to overclock.

CPU Cooler

Since the processor can become very warm under load, it is necessary to ensure that the heated air is removed and the cooler thus ensures that the CPU temperature is reduced.

A CPU cooler consists of a heat sink (made of aluminum, metal or cast iron) and a fan that removes the air.

Usually, processors can be ordered as so-called “boxed” processors, i.e. a fan adapted to the respective model is added to the CPU.

If you don’t want a boxed CPU, you can also order the normal CPU version and then of course you have to make sure that the CPU doesn’t die a premature heat death by using a fan of your own choice.

It can make sense to install your own cooler, e.g. if you want a very low noise level, optimal cooling performance or just the look (yes, a real cooler really makes something ;)).

Usually the price difference between the boxed version of the CPU and the version without cooler is not very big – about 10 Dollar.

So if you have a compact budget, you can safely go for the boxed version.

Dependencies of the CPU to other components

  • Mainboard (socket must match the CPU, mainboard should have overclocking properties if the CPU has a free clock)
  • CPU cooler (socket, cooling capacity must be appropriate for the CPU)
  • CPU (CPU should support the maximum clock speed of the main memory)
  • With very powerful (and therefore mostly energy-hungry) processors, you should make sure to use a sufficiently strong power supply. Tools like our power supply calculator will help you to find the right power supply.


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