Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops

| | , ,

Winner
2020 Toshiba Dynabook Tecra A50-F 15.6" Full HD FHD (1920x1080) Business Laptop (Intel Quad Core i7-8565U, 32GB DDR4 RAM, 1TB M.2 SSD) Wi-Fi 6, Type-C, HDMI, DVD, VGA, Windows 10 Pro+IST HDMI Cable
Best Price
Lenovo IdeaPad L340 17.3” Gaming Laptop, Intel core i7-9750H, 8GB RAM,512GB M.2 NVMe QLC SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 4GB GDDR5,6.5 Hours Battery Life
Model
Toshiba Dynabook Tecra A50-F
Lenovo IdeaPad L340
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent May 2020
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good May 2020
Manufacturer
Toshiba Dynabook
Lenovo
RAM
32 GB
8 GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-8565U
Intel core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
Integrated Intel UHD 620
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 (4GB)
Storage Capacity
1 TB SSD
512 GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
4.8 lbs.
6.2 lbs.
Recommended by us?
Pros
  • Beautiful, compact design.
  • Colorful display with 3:2 aspect ratio.
  • Great performance
  • USB-C docker included
  • Best price-performance ratio of all Laptops
  • Good input devices
  • Stays cool even under load
  • Solid chassis
Cons
  • No SD card slot
  • No Thunderbolt 3
  • Memory not expandable
Winner
2020 Toshiba Dynabook Tecra A50-F 15.6" Full HD FHD (1920x1080) Business Laptop (Intel Quad Core i7-8565U, 32GB DDR4 RAM, 1TB M.2 SSD) Wi-Fi 6, Type-C, HDMI, DVD, VGA, Windows 10 Pro+IST HDMI Cable
Model
Toshiba Dynabook Tecra A50-F
Test Result
Test Result 9.7/10 Excellent May 2020
Manufacturer
Toshiba Dynabook
RAM
32 GB
CPU
Intel Core i7-8565U
Graphics Card
Integrated Intel UHD 620
Storage Capacity
1 TB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
4.8 lbs.
Recommended by us?
Pros
  • Beautiful, compact design.
  • Colorful display with 3:2 aspect ratio.
  • Great performance
  • USB-C docker included
Cons
  • No SD card slot
  • No Thunderbolt 3
Best Price
Lenovo IdeaPad L340 17.3” Gaming Laptop, Intel core i7-9750H, 8GB RAM,512GB M.2 NVMe QLC SSD, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 4GB GDDR5,6.5 Hours Battery Life
Model
Lenovo IdeaPad L340
Test Result
Test Result 9.5/10 Very Good May 2020
Manufacturer
Lenovo
RAM
8 GB
CPU
Intel core i7-9750H
Graphics Card
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 (4GB)
Storage Capacity
512 GB SSD
Battery Time
Value for money
Weight
6.2 lbs.
Recommended by us?
Pros
  • Best price-performance ratio of all Laptops
  • Good input devices
  • Stays cool even under load
  • Solid chassis
Cons
  • Memory not expandable

Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops: Toshiba (Dynabook) in Detail

The upheavals in the Japanese electronics industry, which have been ongoing for some time, are now also casting their shadow on the local market. In the future, there will be no more Toshiba notebooks to buy here, as in Europe. However, the fans of the previous lines will have to adjust to a new name first and foremost. In this Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops test we will find out which are better.

In the future, the manufacturer code “Dynabook” will appear in front of the well-known brand names of the individual series. This is the result of a longer process. The electronics group Toshiba has in any case largely been split up into various subdivisions which were then sold or merged. With regard to PC production, there was a merger with Sharp.

The resulting company has been operating under the name Dynabook since the beginning of the year. This is certainly rather unknown in this country, but in Japan the situation is different. While only those who are familiar with computer history can use the term here, the brand is much more deeply rooted in the home of Toshiba and Sharp.

The Dynabook Satellite Pro L50

Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops: Not only Notebooks

Dynabook Pro L50

Dynabook originally stood for the concept of a portable computer that was actually intended for the education of children and young people. The system was developed in the early 1970s by Alan Kay at the renowned IT research centre Xerox PARC. This not only gave rise to the basic idea of a computer that can be carried around. The graphical user interfaces also had their origins here – because Kay repeatedly emphasized that the system had to adapt to the user’s abilities and not the other way around.

Accordingly, the company naturally also wants to charge the systems sold under the brand in the future with a corresponding meaning. However, the company’s products will continue to be aimed primarily at business customers. Dynabook will also develop data glasses for use in industrial environments.

Toshiba (Dynabook) Design

Dynabook uses a special magnesium alloy for its notebooks. The surface doesn’t feel metallic at all, which is why one would first assume that the laptops have a plastic case. In any case, the surface of the standard onyx blue magnesium case (official manufacturer’s designation) feels excellent. For example the Dynabook Tecra X50 weighs around 1.4 kg and although that might sound a bit heavy the device is pleasingly light for a 15 inch notebook.

As expected, there is nothing to criticize in the workmanship. Dynabook Labtops are easy to maintain, and the devices can be opened with standard cross-head screws on the underside, for example to change the SSD or upgrade the RAM.

Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops Dynabook Product Variety

Toshiba back then had the main Laptop categories ‘Portege’, ‘Sattelite’, and ‘Tecra’. Now under the new business entity Dynabook only ‘Portege’ and ‘Tecra’ are left. ‘Portege’ is the typical travel laptop and well suited for business people that are always on the road or working ‘on the way’. It focuses on a light-weight product with a beautiful and simple design. As it is intended for mobile use the Portege category is only available in sizes up to 13,3 inches. Furthermore, there are two subcatgories in the Portege product line, the A series and the X series. The A series is targets price sensitive users and offers a less powerful spec, while the X series leaves no wishes unfulfilled regarding the power.

The Tecra model is a bigger sized all-purpose business laptop with all functionalities. It is bigger in size and therefore also heavier, but also more powerful. Up to 4 external screens are not posing any problems. Also the Tecra product line is available in different price-categories in order to target different users.

All in all you could say that Dynabook has quite a slim product variety. However, the laptops they are producing are top-notch quality and definitely target the business sector as clientele.

Does Buying Old Toshiba Laptops Make Sense?

Well there are still many old Toshiba Laptop models available on the market. That’s why we chose to highlight the Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops.

And sometimes there are very good offers for a great price available. But does it reall make sense to buy a brand that is not really supported anymore? It depends. First of all you should know that Toshiba only targeted the business sector with their Laptops. The Laptops available are already not up-to-date. Of course you can make a good deal. But is it really worth saving some Dollars for a Laptop, which you will have to get rid of sooner because it cannot handle newer applications anymore? Considering there is no warranty on these products anymore the answer is a clear “No”. If you like Toshiba and their products you should go with a Dynabook Laptop. You get the newest tech with all the support from the manufacturer side.

Lenovo: Overview of the Brand

The company site in northern Beijing, a park with modern buildings and ponds, is reminiscent of the headquarters of Microsoft or Yahoo. The showroom surprises with special effects: the door opens automatically when you throw a paper folded into an airplane into a hole, you can light an Olympic flame and take the Olympic torch in your hand – in a sense the original, because it was designed here.

But what is really amazing in this showroom is not modern design and digital tricks, but the crumbling façade of a decades-old Beijing house that was shipped here. It comes from a barrack in which China’s Academy of Sciences had eleven engineers tinkering with computers from 1984. The state granted them 25,000 dollars as start-up capital, which should be enough. They were registered as a company “Legend”, a revolution in the People’s Republic eight years after Mao, but otherwise they were more of a variant of Bill Gates’ garage for the poor. They were all the more pleased when they were allowed to take over the sale and maintenance of IBM computers in China after a few years.

This is great for the Lenovo brand in our Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops test.

Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops: The company bought IBM for 1.25 billion

Times have changed. In 2005, Lenovo, as the company is now called, bought the PC division of IBM for $1.25 billion. Today the company is the fourth largest manufacturer of personal computers in the world. An advertising slogan claims that these computers are “made in the world”, and in a certain sense this is true, at least if you compare Lenovo with the many US companies that still operate in a rather provincial way: There is no corporate headquarters, but several headquarters, in Beijing and in the US state of North Carolina, in Paris and in Singapore, with development centers in Shanghai and in Yamato, Japan. The CEO is Chinese but lives in the USA, the President is American and lives in Singapore, and the Marketing Director resides in the USA but is of Indian origin. His name is Deepak Advani and he works in Beijing during the Olympics, jokes: “Our top management resembles the United Nations.” And Lenovo is the first Chinese company to sponsor the Olympic Games worldwide, on a par with Coca Cola, McDonalds or Adidas.

The Beijing Games are controlled by more than 12,000 Lenovo computers and broadcast on as many Lenovo large screens. The company’s 600 engineers and technicians are working full-time for the games these days. Lenovo is sponsoring 15 Olympic athletes, including Chinese athletics superstar Liu Xiang, who has just been eliminated due to injury, and German swimmers Markus and Steffen Deibler. Many other Olympic athletes write blogs on the company’s homepage.

Lenovo has designed the torch for the Olympics

One point for Lenovo in our Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops test:

And what no other sponsor in the history of the Olympics has ever achieved: Lenovo employees designed the 2008 Olympic torch. Allegedly there is no connection between the sponsorship and the award of the torch. The Lenovo designers had to prevail in a competition against 388 other models. Did the fact that the Chinese state is Lenovo’s main shareholder with a 21.17 percent stake help?

Lenovo Laptops in Detail

Lenovo’s 15-inch product range includes more than 50 different models with prices ranging from just under 300 Dollar to well over 1,500 Dollar. All demands and price categories are covered. The office and business models, for which Lenovo is primarily known, usually end up first in Laptop tests. Whilst it’s not possible to make any generally valid statements about the performance of Lenovo’s notebooks, a common thread runs through almost every test report:

Lenovo notebooks have excellent keyboards and touchpads we found out in our Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops test.

This applies to the flatter keyboards of the convertible models as well as to the manufacturer’s expensive gaming machines. The quality of the displays seems to be strongly dependent on the chosen price group.

But there are no qualitative outliers either at the lower or the upper end of the price scale – in other words, solid all around.

The manufacturer’s 15 inchers show an average battery life. Especially models with dedicated graphics cards are weaker here, whereas simpler office devices are relatively enduring.

Lenovo Product Variety

ThinkPads as flagship products: Lenovo still bundles its most powerful notebooks in the ThinkPad family. The T and W Series include models in the 14 and 15.6 inch formats, which are both work-friendly and mobile. In addition, the processor power, the working speed of the storage solution (SSD), the resolution and image quality of the display and the workmanship of the case are generally flawless. Consequently, business people or private users with high demands and a well-filled wallet are the main target group (900$+). The notebooks of the X-series, on the other hand, are similarly expensive, but are usually smaller (11.6 and 12.5 inches), thinner, lighter and thus much better suited for use on the road. The equipment, however, is also here – in line with the price level – first class.

So many designs which gives Lenovo mor points in our Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops test.

Miix and Yoga: Flexible mix of tablet and notebook. In recent years, convertible devices have established themselves as a hybrid between tablet and notebook. Lenovo is one of the pioneers in this area and tries to win the buyers’ favor with many different designs and ideas.

IdeaPads: From mobile to multimedia. The IdeaPad family in turn includes notebooks of very different designs. The models in the Yoga and Flex series, for example, can be converted into a mobile tablet if required thanks to their foldable touch screen, while the notebooks in the U series are handy, slim and mobile, but usually cheaper than the members of the X series mentioned above. Lenovo reserves the IdeaPads of the Y family for multimedia and gaming. Here you usually get a Full-HD panel, a crisp CPU as well as solid graphics. Moreover, there is a slot on board in some models, which can be equipped with a further graphics card or a Blu-ray drive if necessary. But: As usual, the whole thing has its price. Thus, you often have to invest a four-digit Dollar amount for an IdeaPad of the Y-series.

Essential: Inexpensive standard notebooks: The range is finally rounded off by the Essential family. The costs here are usually more than moderate (starting at 400 Dollar), especially in the B and G series. On the hardware level, you usually get a simple standard package – but the usual everyday tasks are easily doable, such as daily surfing the net, editing office documents, playing videos or converting music files. Externally, on the other hand, the models are preferably in the mid-size 15.6 inch segment, whereby the panel’s resolution is almost exclusively 1,366 x 768 pixels. And: As always in this price segment, you have to accept some compromises in terms of material and workmanship.

Final Conclusion: Toshiba vs. Lenovo Laptops

To be honest it feels almost a bit unfair to compare these two brands. Dynabook focuses a lot on enterprise clients and serves them ok-ish. The design is still not very modern, but the Laptops are good machines in the daily work life. But nonetheless, the product variety is extremely small. Lenovo in contrast, does an amazing job at offering a lot of high quality variety. With the purchase of IBM in 2005 the company has the know-how to produce excellent Laptops, for every usecase. You get great desgin for a good price.

And if you want super powerful Laptops you can get them at Lenovo, if you are willing to pay more. This is not an option for Dynabook as they don’t even offer super powerful Laptops. If you have the choice you should definitely go with Lenovo as you will get more for your money.

All in all Lenovo is the winner of our Toshiba (Dynabook) vs. Lenovo Laptops review.


Are you interestet in more hot tech deals? Subscribe to our Email-list and we let you know when the best deals come up.

Leave a Comment